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I'm trying to call object properties dynamically. I have solved the problem with eval() but i know that eval is evil and i want to do this on a better and safer way. My eval code:

            // onfocus
            var classes = this.getAttribute('class').split(' ');
            for(var i = 0; i < classes.length; ++i) {
                if(classes[i].match(/val\- */) !== null) {
                    var rule = classes[i].substr(4);
                    var instruction = eval('validate.instructionTexts.'+ rule +'()');

                    tooltip.appendChild( document.createTextNode(instruction) );
                }
            } 

And I also have this code:

       // onblur
        var classes = this.getAttribute('class').split(' ');
        for( var i = 0; i < classes.length; ++i ){
            if(classes[i].match(/val\- */) !== null) {
                var rule = classes[ i ].substr( 4 );
                var tooltip = document.getElementsByClassName( 'tooltip' );
                for( i = 0; i < tooltip.length; ++i){
                    tooltip[ i ].style.display = 'none';
                }

                eval('validate.rules.'+ rule +'(' + (this.value) + ')');
            }

the problem with the second code is that I want to send a string to my property. this.value = the text i type in my textbox so i get correct string from this.value but i got this error.

if i type foo. Uncaught ReferenceError: foo is not defined. Javascript thinks I trying to send a variabel but i want it to send a string. How can i solve this problems?

share|improve this question
1  
If you have to different question, it's better to separate them. It will be easier to have an answer and easier to search for others person with the same type of problems. And you should choose a better title too. – krtek Feb 26 '11 at 12:14
    
That regex matches val- followed by zero or more spaces... – delnan Feb 26 '11 at 12:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. An HTML element's CSS class can be accessed directly from JS thru the className property.
  2. JS object properties can be accessed via the dot-notation object.property or via the square-bracket-notation object['property'].
  3. The regex /val\- */ matches the characters v, a, l, a '-' hyphen, and zero or more spaces, anywhere in the string.
    • The spaces are completely irrelevant since you're testing the result of a string that was split on spaces (and so it won't contain any spaces anymore).
    • Also, you're not anchoring the regex so a class of 'eval-test' will also be matched. I doubt that's what you're looking for.
    • If you were just testing for the classes starting with val-, then the indexOf method is much easier to read, and probably also a lot more efficient.

I've adjusted your bits of code accordingly. I'm assuming that the class names for your validation rules all start with val-, and that the rest of the class name is the name for the rule:

// onfocus
var classes = this.className.split(' ');
for(var i = 0; i < classes.length; ++i) {
    if(classes[i].indexOf('val-') === 0) { // the class name starts with 'val-'
        var rule = classes[i].substr(4);
        var instruction = validate.instructionTexts[rule]();

        tooltip.appendChild(document.createTextNode(instruction));
    }
}


// onblur
var classes = this.className.split(' ');
for (var i = 0; i < classes.length; ++i ){
    if(classes[i].indexOf('val-') === 0) { // the class name starts with 'val-'
        var rule = classes[i].substr(4);
        var tooltip = document.getElementsByClassName('tooltip');
        for (i = 0; i < tooltip.length; ++i){
            tooltip[i].style.display = 'none';
        }

        validate.rules[rule](this.value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You do not need to use eval, you can access it as:

validate.rules[rule](this.value);

Which will solve your other problem too, which is that you are passing in the value of this.value which when eval()'d is not quoted as a string (which 'foo' is) so is being interpreted as a variable.

share|improve this answer

to get a property foo from object obj, you could use either

obj.foo

or

obj["foo"]

The first one won't allow reserved words or if the property contains spaces.

So your first example could change to

validate.instructionTexts[rule]()
share|improve this answer

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