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I'm having trouble understanding this code... I was expecting something similar to threading where I would get an output with random "nooo" and "yaaaay"s interspersed with each other as they both do the printing asynchronously, but rather I discovered that the main thread seems to block on the first calling of coroutine.resume() and thus prevents the next from being started until the first has yielded.

If this is the intended operation coroutines, what are they useful for, and how would I achieve the goal I was hoping for? Would I have to implement my own scheduler for these coroutines to operate asynchronously?, because that seems messy, and I may as well use functions!

co1 = coroutine.create(function ()
        local i = 1
        while i < 200 do
                print("nooo")
                i = i + 1
        end
        coroutine.yield()
end)

co2 = coroutine.create(function ()
        local i = 1
        while i < 200 do
                print("yaaaay")
                i = i + 1
        end
        coroutine.yield()
end)

coroutine.resume(co1)
coroutine.resume(co2)
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3  
Coroutines are not threads. They are thread-like, in that they are separate execution environments, but your program is the scheduler, and they're not preemptive. I would add a full answer, but my Lua is rusty, so I can't provide any code examples... –  Mike Caron Feb 26 '11 at 17:09
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2 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Coroutines aren't threads.

Coroutines are like threads that are never actively scheduled. So yes you are kinda correct that you would have to write you own scheduler to have both coroutines run simultaneously.

However you are missing the bigger picture when it comes to coroutines. Check out wikipedia's list of coroutine uses. Here is one concrete example that might guide you in the right direction.

-- level script
-- a volcano erupts every 2 minutes
function level_with_volcano( interface )

   while true do
      wait(seconds(5))
      start_eruption_volcano()
      wait(frames(10))
      s = play("rumble_sound")
      wait( end_of(s) )
      start_camera_shake()

      -- more stuff

      wait(minutes(2))
    end


end

The above script could be written to run iteratively with a switch statement and some clever state variables. But it is much more clear when written as a coroutine. The above script could be a thread but do you really need to dedicate a kernel thread to this simple code. A busy game level could have 100's of these coroutines running without impacting performance. However if each of these were a thread you might get away with 20-30 before performance started to suffer.

A coroutine is meant to allow me to write code that stores state on the stack so that I can stop running it for a while (the wait functions) and start it again where I left off.

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Thanks, This answers my questions very well! –  kellpossible Feb 26 '11 at 18:06
1  
@deft Just to help clarify, how does the above example work? As I understand lua has 3 primary functions to support coroutines: create, resume and yield. afaik wait isn't a built-in lua function. So is wait implemented by you? Where does the yielding happen? How do you ensure this coroutine resume's after x amount of time has passed since the last yield? –  greatwolf Aug 26 '11 at 21:51
2  
@Victor, yes you implement it yourself. I added the extra stuff you could see how nice Lua coroutines can be for scripting. The main program (in C or Lua) creates a coroutine to run level_with_volcano. The end_of, frames, seconds, and minutes functions return a special type that wait understands. The wait function uses that special type to decide how long the coroutine needs to sleep and yields that value to the main program. The main program goes on about its business (drawing, updating, etc) and after enough time has passed it resumes the level_with_volcano coroutine. –  deft_code Aug 26 '11 at 22:10
3  
@deft_code Could you provide a simplified lua code of this particular use case? I've spent three hours trying to grok the concept of coroutines and now I feel very stupid because I still can't implement your example. –  Nek Aug 26 '12 at 13:16
3  
I see this hasn't been touched in over a year, but I'd also like to see the code implementation for the wait function. –  ccjuju Dec 11 '12 at 6:48
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co1 = coroutine.create(
    function()
        for i = 1, 100 do
            print("co1_"..i)
            coroutine.yield(co2)
        end
    end
)

co2 = coroutine.create(
    function()
        for i = 1, 100 do
            print("co2_"..i)
            coroutine.yield(co1)
        end
    end
)

for i = 1, 100 do
    coroutine.resume(co1)
    coroutine.resume(co2)
end
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