Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to do pagination in a stored procedure in SQL Server, like this:

/*Assign a row number to each row*/
SELECT
ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY A, B, C ASC) AS ROW_NUMBER,
A, B, C
FROM ABC
WHERE ROW_NUMBER BETWEEN @startRecordNumber and @endRecordNumber

But, my calling code also wants to know how many results were in the original results set before pagination. So, I change my code to this:

/*Put the results into a temp table first*/
SELECT
ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY A, B, C ASC) AS ROW_NUMBER,
A, B, C
INTO #TOTAL_RESULTS
FROM ABC

/*Get the total results from @@RowCount*/
declare @totalResults bigint
set @totalResults = @@RowCount

/*Now just get the desired page from the temp table*/
SELECT
A, B, C
FROM #TOTAL_RESULTS
WHERE ROW_NUMBER BETWEEN @startRecordNumber and @endRecordNumber

DROP TABLE #TOTAL_RESULTS

This feels pretty roundabout to me. Is there any way to get the size of the original result set without having to make a temp table? Maybe just a Common Table Expression instead? I can't seem to figure out a way to do it.

In case it matters, here is ABC's schema:

ABC
A (PK, smallint not null)
B (PK, smallint not null)
C (PK, smallint not null)

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use windowed aggregate functions. i.e COUNT(*) OVER() example below.

;WITH cte As
(
SELECT *, 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY number) AS RN,
        COUNT(*) OVER() AS Cnt
FROM master..spt_values
)
SELECT *
FROM cte 
WHERE RN BETWEEN 101 and 200

Or- Not really a serious suggestion but does avoid spools, work tables and double sorts :-)

DECLARE @Spid INT = @@Spid
DECLARE @TraceID INT

DECLARE @maxfilesize BIGINT = 5
DECLARE @filepath NVARCHAR(200) = N'C:\trace_' + LEFT(NEWID(),36)

EXEC sp_trace_create @TraceID OUTPUT, 0, @filepath, @maxfilesize, NULL 

exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 146, 1, 1
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 146, 22, 1
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 146, 34, 1
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 146, 51, 1
exec sp_trace_setevent @TraceID, 146, 12, 1
-- filter for spid
EXEC sp_trace_setfilter @TraceID, 12, 0, 0, @Spid
-- start the trace
EXEC sp_trace_setstatus @TraceID, 1


;WITH cte AS
(
SELECT number, type, name, 
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY number, type, name) AS RN
FROM master..spt_values
)
SELECT * FROM cte
WHERE RN BETWEEN 101 AND 200
OR RN+1 =0 /*To stop a "TOP 200" getting added to the plan*/

;WITH  XMLNAMESPACES ('http://schemas.microsoft.com/sqlserver/2004/07/showplan' as sql)
     SELECT  ActualRows
         FROM   fn_trace_getinfo(@TraceID) fn
                CROSS APPLY fn_trace_gettable(CAST(value AS NVARCHAR(200)), 1)
                CROSS APPLY (SELECT CAST(TextData AS XML) AS xPlan) x
                CROSS APPLY (SELECT T.relop.value('@ActualRows', 'INT') AS ActualRows
                             FROM   xPlan.nodes('//sql:RelOp[@LogicalOp="Segment"]/sql:RunTimeInformation/sql:RunTimeCountersPerThread') T(relop)) ca
         WHERE  property = 2
                AND ObjectName<>'fn_trace_getinfo' AND TextData NOT LIKE '%ThisQuery%'  

-- Stop the trace
EXEC sp_trace_setstatus @TraceID, 0
-- Close and delete the trace
EXEC sp_trace_setstatus @TraceID, 2
share|improve this answer
    
I forgot about windowed aggregates, +1. –  Andriy M Feb 26 '11 at 18:11
    
Hm... good idea. So, with my approach, I can stick the total results in a variable, but I have to use a temp table. With your approach, you can use a CTE, but you'd have to call Count() to get the total results instead of just getting what's already there in @@RowCount. And you'd have to return that Count field for every row in the result set... I'm really not sure if that's better or not from a performance standpoint. –  Tedderz Feb 26 '11 at 18:24
1  
@Tedderz - From a performance POV I'm not sure which would be best either. Using windowed aggregate functions adds a spool to the plan and tends to increase the number of logical reads by quite a lot. It would be better if there was a plan that avoided the spool but so far I can't think if that's possible. –  Martin Smith Feb 26 '11 at 18:36
1  
@Tedderz TBH I think your existing approach is likely to be better. The plan for the windowed aggregate approach does all the row numbering then puts the rows into a lazy spool (which is just a temporary table anyway AFAIK) then does count(*) on the spool, before it churns out the rows from the spool with the result of count(*) appended on as an extra column. It then sorts the output by row_number before finally filtering on RN between 100 and 200. If you were to use a #temp table or table variable indexed on an identity column for row_number you could just select using the index. –  Martin Smith Feb 26 '11 at 20:26

As far as I know, it is not possible both to return rows and to assign variables at the same time with SQL Server. So if you want the row count to be stored into a variable, you'll have to have more than one statement one way or the other.

But if it is fine to return the total as a column and if there are no duplicates in the table by the A, B & C columns, you could return the total, for example, like this:

SELECT
  A, B, C,
  TotalResults = RowNumAsc + RowNumDesc - 1
FROM (
  SELECT
    A, B, C,
    RowNumAsc = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY A, B, C),
    RowNumDesc = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY A DESC, B DESC, C DESC)
  FROM
) s
WHERE RowNumAsc BETWEEN @startRecordNumber AND @endRecordNumber
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It does mean potentially 2 sort operations but probably has a better execution plan that my answer. –  Martin Smith Feb 26 '11 at 20:21
    
@Martin you're too humble - your code should have a better plan, even if this one is snazzy. Both require a separate window, but this one needs to number each row and perform the tricky maths. +1 both –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 26 '11 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.