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I have 5 strings, such as: "one", "two", "three", "four", and "five". I need to get all permutations of these strings. I've explored all internet resources, but all solutions are so bulky and it's hard for me to understand it and integrate it to my program.
So, maybe you know any easy solution how to get permutations.

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1  
Permutations of the strings to mean order in which they are stored or do you mean the order of the individual characters in each string? –  AndyPerfect Feb 26 '11 at 17:50
    
It means order in which they're stored. Words order. –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 17:52
    
Do you want "oneoneoneoneone", "oneoneoneonetwo" all the way to "fivefivefivefivefive"? –  Brian Rasmussen Feb 26 '11 at 17:58
    
No-no. For example: 123. It would: 123, 132, 213, 231, 312, 321. –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 18:03
    
Is this a homework assignment? –  Jakub Konecki Feb 27 '11 at 9:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Permutations are very easy to do.

/// <summary>
/// Returns all permutations of the input <see cref="IEnumerable{T}"/>.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="source">The list of items to permute.</param>
/// <returns>A collection containing all permutations of the input <see cref="IEnumerable&lt;T&gt;"/>.</returns>
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Permutations<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    if (source == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    // Ensure that the source IEnumerable is evaluated only once
    return permutations(source.ToArray());
}

private static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> permutations<T>(IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    var c = source.Count();
    if (c == 1)
        yield return source;
    else
        for (int i = 0; i < c; i++)
            foreach (var p in permutations(source.Take(i).Concat(source.Skip(i + 1))))
                yield return source.Skip(i).Take(1).Concat(p);
}
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using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace caComb
{
    class Program
    {
        private static List<List<string>> allCombinations = new List<List<string>>();
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string[] words = new string[] { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };
            List<string> temp = new List<string>();
            GetCombinations(words, temp);
            // Here you can read all combinations from
            // allCombinations. Do whatever you want.
        }

        private static void GetCombinations(string[] words, List<string> temp)
        {
            if (temp.Count == words.Length)
            {
                List<string> clone = temp.ToList();
                if (clone.Distinct().Count() == clone.Count)
                {
                    allCombinations.Add(clone);
                }
                return;
            }

            for (int i = 0; i < words.Length; i++)
            {
                temp.Add(words[i]);
                GetCombinations(words, temp);
                temp.RemoveAt(temp.Count - 1);
            }

        }
    }
}
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Here's a class that works in .Net 2.0. First, sort your array. Then use it by looping over while(Permute.Next(array)). When there are no more permutations, Permute.Next returns false.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;

public class Permute
{
    public static bool Next(IList<IComparable> list)
    {
        int k = FindSmallestK(list);
        if (k < 0) return false;
        int l = FindLargestL(list, k);
        Swap(list, k, l);
        Reverse(list, k + 1);
        return true;
    }

    private static void Reverse(IList<IComparable> list, int p)
    {
        for (int i = p, j = list.Count - 1; i < j; i++, j--)
        {
            Swap(list, i, j);
        }
    }

    private static void Swap(IList<IComparable> list, int k, int l)
    {
        IComparable temp = list[k];
        list[k] = list[l];
        list[l] = temp;
    }

    private static int FindLargestL(IList<IComparable> list, int k)
    {
        for (int i = list.Count - 1; i > k; i--)
        {
            if (list[k].CompareTo(list[i]) < 0) return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }

    private static int FindSmallestK(IList<IComparable> list)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < list.Count - 1; i++)
        {
            if (list[i].CompareTo(list[i + 1]) < 0) return i;
        }
        return -1;
    }
}
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This article shows the complete code for getting all permutations of letters. Substitute letters with words and you have your solution:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Premutations.aspx

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Thanx, I've tried to modify it, but I can't yet. No matter what this example is very very good. –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 18:00
    
So have you any ideas, how to modify it, cause this code use CharArray. How to make it using string[]? –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 18:40
    
Could the downvoter add an explanation, please? –  Jakub Konecki Feb 27 '11 at 9:33
    
Oh, I'm sorry, it was my stupid mistake! I have another problem at all! I need COMBINATIONS!! –  Daria Feb 27 '11 at 9:35
1  
You might want to edit your question as it has Permutations written all over it... –  Jakub Konecki Feb 27 '11 at 10:38

This is a pretty nice combinatorics library - http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/Combinatorics.aspx

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Thanx, I will check it. –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 18:05

The permutation article on wikipedia has a good summary of some example algorithms

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permutation#Systematic_generation_of_all_permutations

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Thanx for answer. –  Daria Feb 26 '11 at 17:53

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