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In a multithreaded Java application I need to iterate over a collection of objects. Since both the collection and the objects could be modified by another thread while I iterate over them, I need to use synchronization.

However nested synchronized blocks are not recommended since they could lead to deadlocks. How would I solve this problem?

Collection<Data> dataCollection = something.getDataCollection();

synchronized ( dataCollection ) {
  for ( final Data data : dataCollection ) {
    synchronized ( data ) {
      data.doSomething();  // doSomething() changes object state
    }
  }
}
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can you say some more about why you need to synchronize your collection, i.e. does your Data members depend on each other or do you have some kind of logic which looks at all the members at once and cannot handle add or removes? –  ThomasRS Feb 26 '11 at 18:37
    
New Data instances could be added to the collection by another thread. –  Sven Jacobs Feb 26 '11 at 19:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you can use CopyOnWriteArrayList instead of the outer synchronization.

A thread-safe variant of ArrayList in which all mutative operations (add, set, and so on) are implemented by making a fresh copy of the underlying array. This is ordinarily too costly, but may be more efficient than alternatives when traversal operations vastly outnumber mutations, and is useful when you cannot or don't want to synchronize traversals, yet need to preclude interference among concurrent threads

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You can take a copy of the collection and only lock one object at a time.

Collection<Data> dataCollection = something.getDataCollection();
Collection<Data> copy;
synchronized ( dataCollection ) {
  copy = new ArrayList<Data>(dataCollection);
}

for (Data data : copy) {
    synchronized ( data ) {
      data.doSomething();  // doSomething() changes object state
    }
}
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Nested synchronization can lead to deadlock, but it doesn't have to. One way to avoid deadlocks is to define an order that you synchronize objects and always follow it.

If you always synchronize the dataCollection object before you synchronize the data objects, you won't deadlock.

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3  
that's good in case you are sure noone will violate this. But imagine a big project, 30 developers, someone won't even know about the above piece of code and may synchronize in the wrong order. => Deadlock that will be hard to trace. –  Bozho Feb 26 '11 at 18:35
    
@Bozho: The order you acquire your locks in should probably be part of the system documentation. It might be an easier task if all the code that needs to use these locks were part of the same smaller module within that big project. –  Karmastan Feb 26 '11 at 20:15
    
Conceptually, it should be easy for a runtime to detect this kind of a deadlock once it happens. I just don't know if there are Java tools to do this. –  Karmastan Feb 26 '11 at 20:18
    
there is - any tool that makes thread dumps. But it's still hard to trace what exactly caused it. As for the documentation and modules - yes, I agree it should work like that. But not many read documentation –  Bozho Feb 26 '11 at 20:39

Can't believe nobody pointed out that the number one way to avoid synchronizing on the Data object is to have this object itself thread-safe! It's also the correct way of handling synchronization - if you know that your object will be accessed by multiple threads, handle synchronization the way you see fit inside the class, not in the code that may access it. You will also certainly be more efficient because you can limit synchronization to just the critical blocks, use ReadWriteLock, j.u.c.atomic, etc

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Take a look at ReentrantReadWriteLock. With this class you can implement a lock that makes it possible for any number of non-modifying (reading) threads to access the shared property simultaneously, but only one modifying (writing) thread to access it at a time (all other readers and writers are blocked until the writing thread releases the write-lock). Remember to test your implementation thorougly, as wrong usage of the locks can still lead to race condition and/or deadlocks.

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Whether you use CopyOnWriteArrayList as Bozho said or copy the list before iterating as Peter says should depend on how much you expect the list to be edited compared to iterated over.

Use CopyOnWriteArrayList when you expect the list to be iterated over far more than it is modified.

Use copying the list if you think it will be modified far more than it is iterated over.

These should be the first options because concurrency solutions should be simple unless unavoidable, but if neither situation applies you will need to pick one of the more complicated strategies outlined in the comments here.

Good luck!

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