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We have an investment advisory organisation as a client. They provide reporting on their clients’ investments to them. We’re designing a reporting structure for them, however I’m unsure of the optimum database design that caters for the two structures that their clients have.

Structure 1: Client has a retirement fund which invests directly in a combination of mutual funds / unit trust funds. These mutual funds in turn invest in securities such as listed equities.
Structure 2: Client has a retirement fund which invests in a combination of internal portfolios (funds) which in turn invest in mutual funds (which invest in securities).

It’s very easy to cater for Structure 1 by itself, and also simple to cater for Structure 2 by itself. However some clients will be utilising Structure 1 and others Structure 2, and I don’t want to have to have separate queries and reporting for them. One option I’ve thought of is to design for Structure 2 and if a client is on Structure 1, then include a “dummy” internal portfolio. For example, in the example below, Retirement Fund 1 is structured according to Structure 1 and Retirement Fund 3 is structured according to Structure 2 using a dummy internal portfolio. See views vw_Structure1 and vw_Structure2.

I’m looking for the best way of doing this. Any ideas?

PS: Seems to be a problem posting the DDL, so will post remainder as new post

SET ANSI_NULLS ON  
GO  
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON  
GO  
CREATE TABLE [2-InternalPortfolio](  
    [InternalPortfolioID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,  
    [InternalPortfolioName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,  
 CONSTRAINT [PK_2-InternalPortfolio] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED   
(  
    [InternalPortfolioID] ASC  
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]  
) ON [PRIMARY]  
GO  
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [2-InternalPortfolio] ON  
INSERT [2-InternalPortfolio] ([InternalPortfolioID], [InternalPortfolioName]) VALUES (1, N'High Growth')  
INSERT [2-InternalPortfolio] ([InternalPortfolioID], [InternalPortfolioName]) VALUES (2, N'Conservative')  
INSERT [2-InternalPortfolio] ([InternalPortfolioID], [InternalPortfolioName]) VALUES (3, N'Dummy Internal Portfolio')  
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [2-InternalPortfolio] OFF  
SET ANSI_NULLS ON  
GO  
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON  
GO  
CREATE TABLE [Security](  
    [SecurityID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,  
    [SecurityName] [varchar](50) NOT NULL,  
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Security] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED   
(  
    [SecurityID] ASC  
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]  
) ON [PRIMARY]  
GO  
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [Security] ON  
INSERT [Security] ([SecurityID], [SecurityName]) VALUES (1, N'Company 1')  
INSERT [Security] ([SecurityID], [SecurityName]) VALUES (2, N'Company 2')  
INSERT [Security] ([SecurityID], [SecurityName]) VALUES (3, N'Company 3')  
INSERT [Security] ([SecurityID], [SecurityName]) VALUES (4, N'Company 4')  
SET IDENTITY_INSERT [Security] OFF  
SET ANSI_NULLS ON  
GO  
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON  
GO  
share|improve this question
    
You'd better present you database in some general visual model, which is easy to understand than your MSSQL Server DDL, which not users can execute because they can use MySQL, Oracle... tag this as MS SQL Server then not a database design. –  Alex Burtsev Feb 27 '11 at 10:12
    
Good point Alex. Is there any way to post an image? –  Saul Margolis Feb 27 '11 at 18:46

1 Answer 1

It boils down to the business rules, really.

If the behavior internal portfolios operates under a significantly different set of rules than mutual funds, then store them in separate tables and use views to combine them for reporting purposes. Both the internal fund table and the mutual fund table would have a foreign key pointing back to your customer table.

If they're largely the same, the SEC views them similarly, etc., then I would use a design pattern similar to what a manufacturing organization would use for product assemblies & sub-assemblies (search for "Bill of Materials data model") or the single-table design pattern for Employees & their managers (where an employee's ManagerID is the EmployeeID of their Manager).

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Phil, Not sure what a manufacturing org would use for product assemblies and sub-assemblies? –  Saul Margolis Feb 27 '11 at 18:45
    
Basically, it would be 1 table that stored company stock shares, mutual funds, and "managed funds". Records for "managed" funds would have multiple rows that point to their individual component investments. Now that I've had more time to think about it, it's more akin to a single table that stores employee/manager data (EmployeeID, EmployeeName, ManagerID) where the ManagerID is that person's EmployeeID. You'd have to tweak that model to handle quantities. To report on it, you would select from the tables recursively in a view. CTEs in SQL Server are very handy for that. –  Phil Helmer Feb 28 '11 at 10:24

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