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We have [NSString sizeWithFont:] which returns the size of the entire string.

What about getting an array of the sizes of each individual character within the string?

How would you do that (besides tokenizing the string and calling sizeWithFont for each)?

Best, Vance

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You should be able to get size information about individual glyphs (note though that those don't always map one-to-one with individual characters in a string) by using the Core Graphics function CGFontGetGlyphBBoxes.

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Thanks, CGFontGetGlyphBBoxes is exactly what I was looking for! But how do you generate a list of Glyphs (given a string)? I found one private API that does that but am afraid to use it since Apple might reject my app. –  vance Feb 26 '11 at 22:35
    
It looks like you could get them fairly easily using this API from Core Text: CTFontGetGlyphsForCharacters. From the docs: "Provides basic Unicode encoding for the given font, returning by reference an array of CGGlyph values corresponding to a given array of Unicode characters for the given font." –  jlehr Feb 27 '11 at 5:05
    
Very cool, Thank you! –  vance Feb 27 '11 at 6:55
    
By the way, why does BBoxes returns 0 for spacebar? (It does return valid data for other chars). Also, there is CTFontGetBoundingRectsForGlyphs which does the same as CGFontGetGlyphBBoxes but you don't have to convert the CTFontRef to a CGFontRef. –  vance Feb 28 '11 at 6:54
    
Found the solution. I guess for white space it only has to "advance" the pointer along x and y. So CTFontGetAdvancesForGlyphs gives you the advance for the white space. For western style languages y is always the same. –  vance Feb 28 '11 at 14:13
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