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I am reading Java concurrency in practice and the below examples are from that. And my questions are What do they mean by this reference escape?. What will be the problem? . How does the this reference escapes from doSomething(e).

public class ThisEscape {
    public ThisEscape(EventSource source) {
        source.registerListener(
            new EventListener() {
                public void onEvent(Event e) {
                    doSomething(e);
                }
            }
        );
    }
}

How does this solves the problem

public class SafeListener {
    private final EventListener listener;
    private SafeListener() {
        listener = new EventListener() {
            public void onEvent(Event e) {
                doSomething(e);
            }
        };
    }
    public static SafeListener newInstance(EventSource source) {
        SafeListener safe = new SafeListener();
        source.registerListener(safe.listener);
        return safe;
    }
}

Edit :

I have tried the below examples

public class Escape {
    public  Escape( Printer printer ){
        printer.print(new Escaper(){
            @Override
            public void parentData(){
            theCulprit1(Escape.this);
            }
            public String name = "shal";
            @Override
            public void theCulprit(){
            System.out.println( this.name );
            System.out.println( Escape.this.age );
            }
        });
        canAccess();
    }
    public void  canAccess(){
    this.age = "25";
    }
    public String age = "62";
    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    public static void main(String args[]){
    Escape escape = new Escape(new Printer());
    }
}

class Printer{
    public void print(Escaper escaper){
    escaper.theCulprit();
    escaper.parentData();
    }
}

class Escaper{
    public void parentData(){
    }
    public void theCulprit(){
    }
    public void theCulprit1(Escape escape){
    System.out.println(escape.age);
    }
}

Due to incomplete construction of the escape object This outputs shal 62 62

Where as i changed my code like this

public class Escape {
    private final Escaper escaper;
    private Escape( ){
        escaper = new Escaper(){
            @Override
            public void parentData(){
            theCulprit1(Escape.this);
            }
            public String name = "shal";
            public void theCulprit(){
            System.out.println( name );
            System.out.println( age );
            }
        };
        canAccess();
    }
    public void  canAccess(){
    age = "25";
    }
    public String age = "62";
    public static Escape newInstance( Printer printer){
    Escape escape = new Escape();
    printer.print(escape.escaper);
    return escape;
    }
    @SuppressWarnings("unused")
    public static void main(String args[]){
    Escape.newInstance(new Printer());
    }
}

Where as here.It outputs shal 25 25

Am i right ? Also is there any re-ordering of operations, because in the first example the age got initialized to 62. Even without making the escaper field final in my second example it works !

share|improve this question
    
Language? Platform? And what are you actually asking here? –  Oded Feb 26 '11 at 20:46
    
@Oded i have edited my post –  John Feb 26 '11 at 21:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In the first form, the event listener object gets registered to the event source within the constructor, and thus it makes itself (and by association the "this" object) available to the event source before the constructor completes. If the inner class object escapes, so does the outer object.

Why is this a problem? Once the event listener is registered, the event source may invoke its methods at any time. Imagine a thread that the event source is using starts invoking the event listener methods. This now can happen even before the constructor completes.

This problem is worse than it appears, however, due to visibility issues. Even if you make the registration the "last operation" that the constructor does, there is still the possibility of seeing partially constructed object or an object in an invalid state. There is simply no visibility guarantee in the absence of a proper happens-before ordering.

Declaring it final affords that happens-before ordering (thus the second form).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great explanation! –  templatetypedef Feb 26 '11 at 22:50
    
Thanks for your explanation.I can understand what you are saying theoretically. I tried to some programs to prove what you are saying. but i am not able to do it. Can you give me a working example. how does the escaping this reference will have such an impact –  John Feb 27 '11 at 7:22
    
Visibility issues are not present in a single threaded situation. They manifest themselves when multiple threads interleave. Even then, it is not so easy to reliably reproduce the issues. Failures would be infrequent and random. –  sjlee Feb 28 '11 at 0:35

when ever you have an inner class that is not static, like

class Outer {
    class Inner {
    }
}

the inner class has a hidden field that references the outer class, so you can imagine that it is like this

class Outer {
    class Inner {
        Outer hiddenOuter;
    }
}

So whereever the inner object is used, the outer object is referenceable, and thus it's lifetime is at least as long as the inner object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: The title of the book Java concurrency in practice seems to mean the reason mentioned by sjlee, but this here is another important point: inner objects used as a EventListener ensure that the outer object is not garbage-collected before the inner object is removed from the source (or the source itself is collected). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 26 '11 at 23:16
    
Thanks.I haven't thought about it before, now i got it –  John Feb 27 '11 at 8:04

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