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Does anyone know how to convert JS dateTime to MySQL datetime? Also is there a way to add a specific number of minutes to JS datetime and then pass it to MySQL datetime?

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3 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

While JS does possess enough basic tools to do this, it's pretty clunky.

/**
 * You first need to create a formatting function to pad numbers to two digits…
 **/
function twoDigits(d) {
    if(0 <= d && d < 10) return "0" + d.toString();
    if(-10 < d && d < 0) return "-0" + (-1*d).toString();
    return d.toString();
}

/**
 * …and then create the method to output the date string as desired.
 * Some people hate using prototypes this way, but if you are going
 * to apply this to more than one Date object, having it as a prototype
 * makes sense.
 **/
Date.prototype.toMysqlFormat = function() {
    return this.getUTCFullYear() + "-" + twoDigits(1 + this.getUTCMonth()) + "-" + twoDigits(this.getUTCDate()) + " " + twoDigits(this.getUTCHours()) + ":" + twoDigits(this.getUTCMinutes()) + ":" + twoDigits(this.getUTCSeconds());
};
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How do you call a function like this with a variable? –  Catfish Mar 12 '13 at 4:50
    
@Catfish You mean with a specific date? You use a Date object. new Date().toMysqlFormat() or new Date(2014,12,14).toMysqlFormat() or whatever. –  kojiro Mar 12 '13 at 12:36
    
Awesome. Thanks for this. –  Catfish Mar 12 '13 at 13:35
2  
This answer had its day while JavaScript was old and clunky. If you target a modern browser, I recommend Gajus' toISOString approach. –  kojiro Dec 18 '13 at 16:18
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I think a nicer approach would be:

var date;
date = new Date();
date = date.getUTCFullYear() + '-' +
    ('00' + (date.getUTCMonth()+1)).slice(-2) + '-' +
    ('00' + date.getUTCDate()).slice(-2) + ' ' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCHours()).slice(-2) + ':' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCMinutes()).slice(-2) + ':' + 
    ('00' + date.getUTCSeconds()).slice(-2);
console.log(date);

or even shorter:

new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 19).replace('T', ' ');

Output:

2012-06-22 05:40:06
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You have an extra opening parenthesis before date.getUTCDate, and yes this is better. –  Adam Lockhart Apr 9 '13 at 16:42
    
Thanks, @AdamLockhart –  Gajus Kuizinas Apr 9 '13 at 18:43
    
Nicer than what? –  kojiro Oct 29 '13 at 13:36
    
Than an implementation suggest by you. –  Gajus Kuizinas Oct 29 '13 at 15:53
2  
this will give problem due to timezone –  Mr Coder Mar 20 at 3:11
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The venerable DateJS library has a formatting routine (it overrides ".toString()"). You could also do one yourself pretty easily because the "Date" methods give you all the numbers you need.

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