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I'm still trying to figure out how the revision numbering works with bzr, despite having read the understanding revision numbers bzr documentation.

I have a local branch of an upstream repository. The local revision is 689, and I haven't made any local changes.

If I do bzr missing url/to/upstream, bzr tells me that I'm missing 10 revisions: 689-698.

Clearly the upstream revision numbering changed, since the remote 689 is now different from my local 689. What I'm trying to figure out is:

What sequence of events causes an upstream branch to get renumbered? Did my local revno 689 become a merged revision number upstream when somebody else made a change and pushed it up?

How can I use the revision-id from my local revision 689 to determine what the merged revision number is upstream? Is there a way to retrieve this using command-line bzr and/or loggerhead?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have 2 questions there, so:

Did my local revno 689 become a merged revision number upstream when somebody else made a change and pushed it up?

Yes, that's exactly what happened.

How can I use the revision-id from my local revision 689 to determine what the merged revision number is upstream?

For CLI bzr:

  1. Simple method: run bzr log -n0 --show-ids and search the output for your revision-id. Then scroll back to the top and see which revision has your revision id merged.

  2. You can use qlog command (from QBzr plugin) to make your history exploring much pleasant.

  3. With bzr 2.3+ you can use mainline: revision modifier: bzr log -r mainline:your-revid

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I think there's a --show-ids argument missing from bzr log (I proposed an edit), but otherwise, that does it. –  Lorin Hochstein Feb 28 '11 at 15:56
    
@lorin yes, you're right. –  bialix Mar 1 '11 at 8:27

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