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I am changing a console app login over to a web based application and recieve the following error about an Unhandled exception.

In the console app I have the following line of code which resides in the StoredProcDemo class:

 StoredProcDemo spd = new StoredProcDemo();

In the Web Application I have:

Login spd = new Login(); 

I am not sure what to change it over to. Could someone shed some insight thanks and maybe why? Thanks so much.

Here is the full code if needed.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web;
using System.Web.UI;
using System.Web.UI.WebControls;
using System.Data;
using System.Data.SqlClient;
using System.Data.Sql;
using System.Data.SqlTypes;

namespace GUI_Login
{
    public partial class Login : System.Web.UI.Page
    {
            SqlConnection conn = null;
            SqlParameter parmReturnValue;

            Login spd = new Login();

        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {   
        }

        protected void btnLogin_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            RunStoredProcParams();
        }

        public void RunStoredProcParams()
        {
            //run simple stored procure
            spd.RunStoredProcParams();

            int Result;
            Result = -1;

            conn = conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.\\SQLEXPRESS;AttachDbFilename=c:\\Program Files\\Microsoft SQL Server\\MSSQL10.SQLEXPRESS\\MSSQL\\DATA\\UserDB.mdf;Integrated Security=True;Connect Timeout=30;User Instance=True; Integrated Security=SSPI");
            conn.Open();

            try
            {
                //create and open a connection object
                conn = conn = new SqlConnection("Data Source=.\\SQLEXPRESS;AttachDbFilename=c:\\Program Files\\Microsoft SQL Server\\MSSQL10.SQLEXPRESS\\MSSQL\\DATA\\UserDB.mdf;Integrated Security=True;Connect Timeout=30;User Instance=True; Integrated Security=SSPI");
                conn.Open();

                //Create the command object indentifying the stored procedure
                SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("PassParamUserID", conn);

                //set the command object so it knows to execute a stored procedure
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                cmd.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@FirstName", txtUserName.Text));
                parmReturnValue = cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UserId", SqlDbType.Int);
                parmReturnValue.Direction = ParameterDirection.ReturnValue;

                cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                Result = Convert.ToInt32(cmd.Parameters["@UserId"].Value);
                conn.Close();

                // lblResult.Text = Result;
                if (Result > 0)
                {
                    lblResult.Text = ("User does exist in database");
                }
                else if (Result < 0)
                {
                    lblResult.Text = ("Denied, try another user name");
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                if (conn != null)
                {
                    conn.Close();
                }
            }

        }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even ignoring RunStoredProcParams you'll get a stack overflow as soon as you try to create a new instance:

public partial class Login : System.Web.UI.Page
{
    // Removed extraneous stuff...
    Login spd = new Login();
}

Why do you want every instance of Login to have a reference to another instance of Login, which it creates immediately?

Basically the constructor is going to be called recursively until it goes bang.

What are you trying to do here, and why? In the console app you may well be creating an instance of StoredProcDemo, but I'm sure it wouldn't be within StoredProcDemo itself (as an instance variable initializer). Perhaps it's in Program or something similar? That would make more sense.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I had it in the Main statment for the console application. I am still an elementry programmer and must dive deeper into Interfaces and using them. –  jpavlov Feb 26 '11 at 21:27
    
Jon, your fix worked. Could you refer me to documentation that I could read to understand more about using instances? I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks for saving my day once again. –  jpavlov Feb 26 '11 at 21:29
1  
@jpavlov: I suggest you start reading an introductory C# book, from the beginning. Diving in with web applications and stored procedures isn't a good way to learn, IMO - there are too many things which could confuse you, all at the same time. –  Jon Skeet Feb 26 '11 at 21:38
1  
@jpavlov: I think @Jon Skeet makes a great point. You are jumping into topics that are all the more difficult let alone knowing C# correctly. You need to start with a plain old C# book, from beginning to basic object oriented programming. Once you understand C#, then you can start looking at books that deal with C# connecting to databases, etc. Too many monsters at once will leave gaps in your knowledge. –  JonH Mar 1 '11 at 16:13
    
@JonH Hey Plus one for great suggestion –  dotNetSoldier May 18 '12 at 11:46

You run RunStoredProcParams() recursively indefinitely.

Comment out this line:

spd.RunStoredProcParams();

Also comment this one:

Login spd = new Login();
share|improve this answer
    
how would you change it? –  jpavlov Feb 26 '11 at 21:09
    
added explanation –  Cosmin Feb 26 '11 at 21:10
    
I get the same error? An unhandled exception of type 'System.StackOverflowException' occurred in GUI_Login.DLL –  jpavlov Feb 26 '11 at 21:13
    
the compiler stops at Login spd = new Login(); –  jpavlov Feb 26 '11 at 21:14
    
@jpavlov: No, the compiler doesn't stop there. It will compile just fine - the fact that you're getting an exception at execution time shows that. –  Jon Skeet Feb 26 '11 at 21:15

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