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I've coded a few, albeit small RESTful Web Services (RWS) before. But In those cases there was total control over the view (presentation layer) i.e., the view was a locally running application on the platform (smartphone?). There was independent control of the view and the RWS at the server that would send JSON (or text or whatever representation that was convenient, let's assume JSON only for the topic).

Now coming to the web: The view (i.e., HTML pages) reside on a server. That server is now supposed to serve the HTML as well as the JSON. My question is how are the 2 separated (or coupled)? Here is an example: enter image description here

Questions:

  1. At step (X) in the image when the wall page is returned to the client all wall posts are populated on that page. If it were a client whose view was not supplied by a server it'd probably just return JSON of wall posts. So how is this situation handled in this case? Should the server return a server side page (SSP) that has all the rendering/formatting logic?

  2. At step (Y) the user wishes to update something on the page and sends a jQuery+Ajax HTTP:PUT to the server (at some URI, so the wall page is a facade?).

Confusions (== Questions ? :-)

  • How do you separate the concerns of JSON + SSP when a request is sent to the server?

  • Is this how web-based clients are designed?? The first page returned (X) is actually a SSP which includes all the logic for making Ajax/REST calls to the server??

  • How does one then go about a good page construction i.e., JSP (say) + jquery + CSS + AJAX?? (Is it possible to have a NO SSP design in this case? i.e. only HTML + jquery + CSS??)

Just a bit confused..

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I guess I'm not understanding exactly what you need here.

But why not simply look at the request Content-Type header and return the client what they ask? If they ask for HTML, send them HTML. If they ask for JSON, send them JSON.

You might want to consider something like JAX-RS which will dispatch to code based on the Content-Type, perhaps that will relieve some of your pain.

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So my confusion is w.r.t. the format. I am ONLY serving JSON. Now the user requests a page of 'posts' my 'Restlet engine' is configured to send Json of the set of posts for a wall. The question is that the HTML (or front-end) is also to be fetched from the server that returns JSON - which implies that I'll have to create 2 representations: As per the diagram above: The GET on the wall returning a JSP and thereafter every subsequent update on the wall via JSON ('cause it's only a small part). Does that sound correct? –  PhD Feb 27 '11 at 7:38
    
Well, clearly you need two representations. One HTML, and one JSON. Is the confusion regarding doing that from a single request? You could easily do a GET on wall.jsp and have it returning a fully rendered page, and then have the internal ajax call updatewall.jsp which returns the JSON formats. Or you can have a single wall.jsp that looks at the Content-Type and parameters of the request, and return the proper HTML or JSON. When the browser hits wall.jsp, it will ask for HTML. When your ajax hits it, it will ask for JSON. Or am I still missing something? –  Will Hartung Feb 27 '11 at 17:05
    
Nope! Bang on target! :) That's basically what my confusion was - I mistakenly assumed that the front-end would be HTML/CSS/JQuery+Ajax, and JSON for transferring data and forgot that the page needs to be 'served' by the server - so I got confused with the step X in the diagram (I thought it could be done in ONE step - don't know why but thought that!) Thanks! –  PhD Feb 27 '11 at 20:02
    
You can return different media types in Restlet too. We have REST web services that actually return one of four different media types for each resource based on the Request's Content-Type header. JSON, XML, the Kryo binary format for high-performance use cases, and XHTML to help developers and operations debug things. (We also support a couple of other binary formats that turned out not as fast as Kryo.) –  Jim Ferrans Mar 24 '11 at 1:29

The web browser is just a rendering engine. It will only render and execute what the web server sends it. In your situation, you have to send the browser html, whether that html is static or generated on the server, is irrelevant to the browser. When the browser renders the html, it also runs any js/css code that you have specified.

* Is this how web-based clients are designed?? The first page returned (X) is actually a SSP which includes all the logic for making Ajax/REST calls to the server??

Yes, the html you send to the browser has js code that tells the browser what to do when certain events happen, like a button click or page load.

* How does one then go about a good page construction i.e., JSP (say) + jquery + CSS + AJAX?? (Is it possible to have a NO SSP design in this case? i.e. only HTML + jquery + CSS??)

yes, you can just serve up a static html page that has all correct js in it, and the browser will do its thing.

I hope that answers your questions?

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Well yes, I'm aware of that. My question is about the integration with REST. The server would return JSON but I ALSO want it to return the corresponding page which would 'render' that JSON as per the JQuery. The question is should I generate the "first" page as a JSP and have it as a facade for every REST call?? (Generating that JSP would be quite messy...but probably that's the way of doing it??) The issue is separating the Requests/responses from views. See this paradox1x.org/archives/2007/08/java-based-web.shtml –  PhD Feb 27 '11 at 5:51

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