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I just finished my first assignment using arrays and I feel like it is a little more complex than it has to be. The program reads a file with scores in it and counts the occurrences of a score within a certain range and then outputs the number of occurrences.

I am wondering if there is a more efficient way of completing this task (using only arrays). I understand the array saved me from having to make 8 separate variables but there are still so many if statements!!

header

#ifndef HEADER_H_INCLUDED
#define HEADER_H_INCLUDED

#include <iostream>
#include <iomanip>
#include <fstream>
#include <cctype>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

void extern input(ifstream&, ofstream&, int&, int*);
void extern calculate (int, int*);
void extern output (ofstream&, int*);


#endif // HEADER_H_INCLUDED

main

#include "header.h"

int main()
{
    int grade;
    int array[8] = {0};
    ifstream inData;
    ofstream outData;

    inData.open("Ch9_Ex4Data.txt");

    if (!inData)
    {
        cout << "Cannot open the input file."
             << endl;
            return 1;
    }

    outData.open("DataOut.txt");

    while (inData)
    {
        input(inData, outData, grade, array);
    }

    output (outData, array);

    system("PAUSE");
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;

}

input

#include "header.h"

void input(ifstream& inData, ofstream& outData, int& grade, int array[])
{
    while(inData >> grade)  // while a grade is read
    {
     calculate(grade, array);
    }
}

calculate

#include "header.h"

void calculate (int grade, int array[])
{
    int index;

        if (grade >= 0 && grade < 25)
        {
        index = 0;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 25 && grade < 50)
        {
        index = 1;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 50 && grade < 75)
        {
        index = 2;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 75 && grade < 100)
        {
        index = 3;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 100 && grade < 125)
        {
        index = 4;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 125 && grade < 150)
        {
        index = 5;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 150 && grade < 175)
        {
        index = 6;
        array[index]++;
        }
        else if (grade >= 175 && grade <= 200)
        {
        index = 7;
        array[index]++;
        }
}

output

#include "header.h"

void output (ofstream& outData, int array [])
{
    outData << "number of students with score of 0-24 is " << array[0] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 25-49 is " << array[1] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 50-74 is " << array[2] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 75-99 is " << array[3] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 100-124 is " << array[4] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 125-149 is " << array[5] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 150-174 is " << array[6] << endl;
    outData << "number of students with score of 175-200 is " << array[7] << endl;
}
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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You're right, because they're evenly spaced it could be a LOT shorter, e.g.

void calculate (int grade, int array[])
{
    if (grade >= 0 && grade < 200) {
        index = grade / 25;
        array[index]++;
    }
    else if (grade == 200)
        array[7]++;
}

output() could be turned into a loop, the calculation for high and low of each bin is straightforward (using multiplication).

If the bins weren't equally spaced, you'd need to use a lookup table like Serge's suggestion.

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2  
+1 You stole the thoughts from my soul. –  ClosureCowboy Feb 26 '11 at 23:04
2  
It only takes one non-continuous change to the ladder, and this breaks. –  Robert Harvey Feb 26 '11 at 23:04
3  
Even if they're not evenly spaced, you can usually make it a lot shorter -- you just need another array. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 26 '11 at 23:05
1  
..To finish @Jerry's thought, the numbers that you have to search for using the if statements can all be placed into an array, then you just have to loop thru that array, checking your value against each element in the array, to find the correct index. Extensive use of if statements generally suggests that there's a better way to do it. –  Robert Harvey Feb 26 '11 at 23:08
    
@Robert Harvey: That is one way, but not the only one. Let's say (for example) that in the code above, he wanted index 4 for grades from 125 to 175. You could use an array something like: int indexes[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 6};, then do the math as in Ben's answer, and use this array to convert from the computed value to the index. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 26 '11 at 23:11
show 5 more comments

As all grades are adjacent, you could use another array to find the array index.

void calculate (int grade, int array[])
{
  int indexMap[] = {25,50,75,100,125,150,175,201};
  int i;

  for(i = 0; i < 8 ; i++) {
    if(grade < indexMap[i]) {
       array[i]++;
       break;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 The first example, not the second. –  Robert Harvey Feb 26 '11 at 23:10
    
Same problem as with first example: for values 175-200 it only counts 5 occurrences when there are 8. –  ddarko Feb 26 '11 at 23:28
    
@Matt If the grades are 200, I missed that it was inclusive, so change the last value to 201. Otherwise it's because there's an error elsewhere, perhaps in reading the values. do some debuging, e.g. print out grade every time your read one. –  nos Feb 26 '11 at 23:31
    
yea, it is inclusive, it works if its changed to 201. brilliant –  ddarko Feb 26 '11 at 23:38
    
um, non-negativity check? The original code had one... –  Ben Voigt Feb 26 '11 at 23:42
show 1 more comment

You should use functions. Code is way nicer to read.

int computeIndex(int grade)
{
    if (grade >= 0 && grade < 25) return 0;
    if (grade >= 25 && grade < 50) return 1;
    if (grade >= 50 && grade < 75) return 2;
    if (grade >= 75 && grade < 100) return 3;
    if (grade >= 100 && grade < 125) return 4;
     //...
    if (grade >= 175 && grade <= 200) return 7;
}

void calculate (int grade, int array[])
{
    int index = computeIndex(grade);
    array[index]++;
}

and you should better use std::vector<int> rather than int array[8], i.e. using the STL aka the Standard C++ Library. That is really worth the learning.

share|improve this answer
    
He's already got more functions that necessary. Your code leaves a lot of simplification potential. And there's no reason to use std::vector for a fixed-size automatic array. –  Ben Voigt Feb 26 '11 at 23:40
    
@Ben Voigt, I have almost banished all C-arrays from my coding... and guess what, all those corresponding bugs with size management and illigal memory access have disappeared. About the specific simplification possible here yes... IMHO I don't think computer science resides in using division operator tricks but, rather using functions and already written libraries ;-) Just my point of view. –  Stephane Rolland Feb 27 '11 at 0:52
    
std::vector doesn't protect you against illegal memory access. Exiting a function without setting the return value isn't good computer science, and even using std::vector you'd be almost guaranteed a crash if any input was outside the range 0 to 200 inclusive (the original code correctly handled invalid input). The appropriate algorithm to apply here is binary search, and of course there is an implementation in the C standard library. –  Ben Voigt Feb 27 '11 at 1:03
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First idea i got - create a constant whitch defines count of indexes and split values per index -


const int numIndexes = 8;
const int[] minValues = { 0, 25, 50 ... }

then run using for statment

You will eliminate if ... else statments and 8 lines of text writing , and code will be more customisable

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I understand the array saved me from having to make 8 separate variables...

This is the problem that arrays solve. They allow you to refer to a collection of data by one indexed name.

...but there are still so many if statements!!

A single array won't really help you much with this part of your problem. If your grades weren't split up into even buckets, then you'd still need the if...else...else if structure to put the data in the right array slot.

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