Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

i.e. what's the equivalent of the browser's "window" object, to which top level functions are attached?

The following code succeeds in the REPL:

var assert = require('assert');
function foo() { };
assert.ok(foo == this["foo"]);

However in a script (or a module) it fails--in both cases "this" is an empty object.

I'm wondering about this so I can easily export all functions visible in a module's namespace--I want to be able to do something like:

function foo() { };
function bar() { };

["foo", "bar"].forEach(function (k) {
    exports[k] = ???;
});

(eval(k) works for the ???, but, ugh.)

share|improve this question
    
The best I could figure out is to export the function when you define it: var foo = exports.foo = function(){...};. Or, you could create your own object containing the functions you'll later export: var fns = {}; fns.foo = function(){...}; ... fns.forEach(...); – Matt Ball Feb 27 '11 at 14:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Matt Ball's answer is pretty good:

var foo = exports.foo = function() {
  //...
};. 

// Or, you could create your own object containing 
// the functions you'll later export: 

var fns = {}; 

fns.foo = function(){...}; 

// ... 

fns.forEach(/*...*/); 

// – Matt Ball Feb 27 at 14:42

Alternatively,

exports.foo = {
  method1: function() { /*...*/ }
, method2: function() { /*...*/ }
, method3: function() { /*...*/ }
  /*...*/
}

Some modules which exhibit best practices: https://github.com/cloudhead/journey/blob/master/lib/journey.js For browser compat: https://github.com/caolan/async/blob/master/lib/async.js https://github.com/mikeal/request/blob/master/main.js

/fyi #node.js IRC welcomes you: http://bit.ly/nodeIRC

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.