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There are test vectors for PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA1 in RFC6070. There are test vectors for HMAC-SHA2 in RFC4231.

But so far I haven't found test vectors for PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA2 anywhere.

I'm most interested in SHA256, so I'll post some vectors I calculated with my implementation. I'd be happy if someone could verify/confirm them, or contribute their own.

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1  
You might consider writing an RFC that describes how to use PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA256 in RFC 2898, and includes the test vectors also. You should do it for all the SHA2 hashes. – James K Polk Feb 27 '11 at 17:13
up vote 15 down vote accepted

I implemented PBKDF2 using the standard hashlib and hmac modules in Python and checked the output against both the RFC 6070 vectors and the vectors you posted – it matches.

Here are the vectors I get with a larger dkLen to match the larger digest output size. This is the output of pbkdf2-test-vectors.py sha256, which takes about 10 minutes to run.

PBKDF2 HMAC-SHA256 Test Vectors

Input:
  P = "password" (8 octets)
  S = "salt" (4 octets)
  c = 1
  dkLen = 32

Output:
  DK = 12 0f b6 cf fc f8 b3 2c
       43 e7 22 52 56 c4 f8 37
       a8 65 48 c9 2c cc 35 48
       08 05 98 7c b7 0b e1 7b (32 octets)


Input:
  P = "password" (8 octets)
  S = "salt" (4 octets)
  c = 2
  dkLen = 32

Output:
  DK = ae 4d 0c 95 af 6b 46 d3
       2d 0a df f9 28 f0 6d d0
       2a 30 3f 8e f3 c2 51 df
       d6 e2 d8 5a 95 47 4c 43 (32 octets)


Input:
  P = "password" (8 octets)
  S = "salt" (4 octets)
  c = 4096
  dkLen = 32

Output:
  DK = c5 e4 78 d5 92 88 c8 41
       aa 53 0d b6 84 5c 4c 8d
       96 28 93 a0 01 ce 4e 11
       a4 96 38 73 aa 98 13 4a (32 octets)


Input:
  P = "password" (8 octets)
  S = "salt" (4 octets)
  c = 16777216
  dkLen = 32

Output:
  DK = cf 81 c6 6f e8 cf c0 4d
       1f 31 ec b6 5d ab 40 89
       f7 f1 79 e8 9b 3b 0b cb
       17 ad 10 e3 ac 6e ba 46 (32 octets)


Input:
  P = "passwordPASSWORDpassword" (24 octets)
  S = "saltSALTsaltSALTsaltSALTsaltSALTsalt" (36 octets)
  c = 4096
  dkLen = 40

Output:
  DK = 34 8c 89 db cb d3 2b 2f
       32 d8 14 b8 11 6e 84 cf
       2b 17 34 7e bc 18 00 18
       1c 4e 2a 1f b8 dd 53 e1
       c6 35 51 8c 7d ac 47 e9 (40 octets)


Input:
  P = "pass\0word" (9 octets)
  S = "sa\0lt" (5 octets)
  c = 4096
  dkLen = 16

Output:
  DK = 89 b6 9d 05 16 f8 29 89
       3c 69 62 26 65 0a 86 87 (16 octets)
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I was able to reproduce all your results correctly in JavaScript using the SJCL library. – Sebastian Aug 18 '11 at 9:20
2  
As well as varying the output size, it might be necessary to extend the input size in test case 5 to have the same effect as the RFC test vectors - passwordPASSWORDpassword at 24 octets exceeded the output size of the SHA1 output, but doesn't exceed the size of your SHA256 output. It's possible this misses some codepaths the RFC test vectors follow - although probably not; I suspect the password would have to exceed the 64-byte block size to make a difference in either case. – James Hart Sep 9 '11 at 14:06
    
Thanks so much for posting test vectors! Can you post one with 64 or more bytes? – Joe Plante Apr 11 '13 at 20:06
1  
Warning: the "default" character encoding of PBKDF2 is UTF-8. You may want to test special characters as well. Java would fail that because it only complies with Windows-1252 (ASCII + 128 special characters). – Maarten Bodewes Sep 15 '15 at 0:48
1  
@MaartenBodewes Java uses "Unicode" (actually UTF-16) for Strings and chars, and supports hundreds of encodings to/from bytes for I/O and similar things like crypto. The default encoding varies; for Windows it is (usually?) cp1252 but other platforms are different. For crypto exactly reproducible data is vital so you should use an explicit encoding not the default, typically UTF-8 to support the broadest data, especially here where 2898 recommends (but doesn't require) UTF-8. – dave_thompson_085 Sep 15 '15 at 14:48

Test vectors for PBKDF2-HMAC-SHA256:

Input values were taken from RFC6070; c is the number of rounds.

Input:
 P = "password" (8 octets)
 S = "salt" (4 octets)
 c = 1
 dkLen = 20
Output:
 DK = 12 0f b6 cf fc f8 b3 2c 43 e7 22 52 56 c4 f8 37 a8 65 48 c9


Input:
 P = "password" (8 octets)
 S = "salt" (4 octets)
 c = 2
 dkLen = 20
Output:
 DK = ae 4d 0c 95 af 6b 46 d3 2d 0a df f9 28 f0 6d d0 2a 30 3f 8e


Input:
 P = "password" (8 octets)
 S = "salt" (4 octets)
 c = 4096
 dkLen = 20
Output:
 DK = c5 e4 78 d5 92 88 c8 41 aa 53 0d b6 84 5c 4c 8d 96 28 93 a0


Input:
 P = "password" (8 octets)
 S = "salt" (4 octets)
 c = 16777216
 dkLen = 20
Output:
 DK = cf 81 c6 6f e8 cf c0 4d 1f 31 ec b6 5d ab 40 89 f7 f1 79 e8


Input:
 P = "passwordPASSWORDpassword" (24 octets)
 S = "saltSALTsaltSALTsaltSALTsaltSALTsalt" (36 octets)
 c = 4096
 dkLen = 25
Output:
 DK = 34 8c 89 db cb d3 2b 2f 32 d8 14 b8 11 6e 84 cf
      2b 17 34 7e bc 18 00 18 1c


Input:
 P = "pass\0word" (9 octets)
 S = "sa\0lt" (5 octets)
 c = 4096
 dkLen = 16
Output:
 DK = 89 b6 9d 05 16 f8 29 89 3c 69 62 26 65 0a 86 87
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I think dkLen = 20 reflects the digest size, so for SHA-256 you should use 32. dkLen = 25 should be larger than the digest size, so that it covers the code path dealing with multiple T blocks; maybe 40. – aaz Feb 27 '11 at 21:23
3  
@aaz: No. dkLen is the Derived Key Length. The digest size is specified in the algorithm by hlen which isn't an input to the PBKDF2 function directly... – ircmaxell Mar 7 '11 at 1:29
    
@ircmaxell – Yes. I meant that the dkLen for the testcases was chosen to match the hLen of the PRF being used. So when adapting the testcases for a different PRF the dkLen should be adjusted. – aaz Mar 7 '11 at 1:58
    
dkLen < 32 is a valid test, but dkLen >= 32 would help a lot since if it's under 32, it'll just crop off the extra octets – Joe Plante Apr 11 '13 at 19:52
    
There should be at least a test > 32. On the other hand, I've got no problem replicating the above test values. – Maarten Bodewes Sep 15 '15 at 0:47

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