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It is like alien language in VS2010 although I've written C++ codes. there are

  • #include<> and #include"" what is the difference
  • no cout
  • what is enline after cout?
  • no stdio but something else. for what it is used? and I think it is not available in other compilers (in Linux)

I wasn't able to print out a simple text in VS2010.

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closed as not a real question by DarenW, Shai, ecatmur, Julius, hjpotter92 Feb 3 '13 at 13:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
But what code have you written ? it doesnt compile or it doesnt run ? –  Stephane Rolland Feb 27 '11 at 0:59
2  
Without posting your code we really cant help you...C++ in VS is the same as C++ in a compiler like gcc (at least for basic C++ operations). Nothing you have mentioned is unique to VisualStudio and actually is present for gcc... –  Chris Thompson Feb 27 '11 at 1:00
1  
Have you googled before ask ? –  CDT May 23 '13 at 0:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 30 down vote accepted

In C++, standard library headers are normally enclosed in <>. And the headers, the programmer declares and uses are normally placed in "" and the compiler, by default, searches for the user defined header file in the project directory. Else you have to give entire path to the file, if exists else where. cout is in iostream. You have to place namespace std also to use it.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

// Now you can use cout in methods/functions.

Edit 1

If you don't specify namespace using the using directive, then you have say std::cout every where you use it because cout is in std namespace.

A simple program to print text in VS-2010

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout<< "Hello World !" <<endl;
    getchar();
    return 0;
}
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1  
Not necessarily, you can either declare it with using or you can fully qualify all references to it with std::cout when you use it. –  Chris Thompson Feb 27 '11 at 1:02

The difference between #include <file> and #include "file" is that the latter searches in the current folder before searching in the include path while #include <file> will only search in the include path.

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The cout stream is std::cout - try that and you should do fine. For an endline you can use \n or the manipulators you were taught.

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You can also write the code as follows

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
  cout<<"Hello World"<<endl;

  system("PAUSE");
  return 0;
}

The system pause will cause the window to close when the user gives an input to close the window, ie presses any key.

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