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I would like to be able to call arbitrary methods on arbitrary objects. Something like:

function applyArbitraryMethod( method, args ) {
    window[method].apply( this, args );
}

applyArbitraryMethod( 'Object.method', args );

which doesn't work, but this does:

function applyArbitraryMethod( object, method, args ) {
    window[object][method].apply( this, args );
}

applyArbitraryMethod( 'Object', 'method', args );

BUT, now I would like to be able to call

applyArbitraryMethod( 'Object.child.grandchild.method', args );

with an arbitrary number of descendents on Object. My current solution is:

function applyArbitraryMethod( objects, args ) {
    objects = objects.split(/\./);
    var method = window;
    for( var i in objects ) method = method[objects[i]];
    method.apply( this, args );
}

But I'm wondering if there's a more straightforward way of achieving the same goal.

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1  
You should really use var i; so i is not global. Using global loop variables is a great way to introduce ugly bugs. –  ThiefMaster Feb 27 '11 at 1:23
    
The straightforward way is to have a reference to the object. I don't understand the constraints you would be under which would cause you to find solutions like this. Could you explain what you want to do in more detail? Would going the whole way to eval("my.other.object('argument')") work? –  Douglas Feb 27 '11 at 1:24
    
The variable names could be better: for example the objects argument is supposed to be a string, then later objects is an array of property names (not the objects themselves), and then there is this statement: method = window, but window isn't a method. –  Douglas Feb 27 '11 at 1:35
    
@ThiefMaster : Good catch, thx. Editing to fix. –  meriial Feb 27 '11 at 2:27
    
@Douglas : My use case is this: I am receiving the arbitrary function and arguments as part of JSON response to an AJAX form post. So it is the server that is providing the 'Object.child...method' string. –  meriial Feb 27 '11 at 2:36

4 Answers 4

This should work:

function applyArbitraryMethod(method, args) {
    method.apply(this, args);
}
applyArbitraryMethod(Object.method, args);
share|improve this answer
    
True, that will work, but not for applyArbitraryMethod( 'Object.method', args ); –  meriial Feb 27 '11 at 2:29
    
Why do you want to put the method name in quotes? What do you gain from doing it that way? If you don't put it in quotes, Javascript automatically "evals" it as part of its normal control flow. Object.method.apply(...) does the same thing as eval('Object.method').apply(...) but the former is more direct and doesn't open the "eval" can of worms. –  Eddy Ferreira Mar 4 '11 at 2:12
    
As stated in a comment above: I am receiving the arbitrary function and arguments as part of JSON response to an AJAX form post. So it is the server that is providing the 'Object.child...method' as a string. So somehow I need to get from "Object.method" (string) to Object.method (object). I agree that the eval is a can of worms, so trying to find an elegant way around it. –  meriial Mar 6 '11 at 2:30

You could do this:

function applyArbitraryMethod( method, args ) {
    var foo = window, bar = method.split('.');
    for(var i=0,fnName; fnName = bar[i];i++) {
      if(foo[fnName]) {
        foo = foo[fnName];
      }
      else {
       throw "whoopsidaisy, you made a typo :)";
      }
    }
    foo.apply( this, args );
}

but as the throw lines shows, this could easily go wrong, and i'd recommend you to go about this another way

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Try this:

function applyArbitraryMethod(objects) {
  if (!objects.match(/^[a-z0-9$_]+(?:\.[a-z0-9$_]+)*$/i)) 
    throw new Error("Invalid input!");
  eval(objects).apply(this, Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
I thought about using 'eval' and somewhere in the back of my head I heard the voices of my programming mentors saying "Never (well, almost never) use 'eval'!!" That would certainly be a more straightforward solution, but is it a 'correct' one? –  meriial Feb 27 '11 at 2:43
    
You're right, eval can be evil... It's a powerful tool, you have to understand it if you're ever going to make good uses of it. If you control the inputs to your function, and no unsanitized user input gets there, you can use it. If you're really worried, you can add a check (a regex will suffice). Also, pay attention to the generic way to pass parameters to a function, which is what you should be using. –  Jordão Feb 27 '11 at 14:27
    
I've added a regex check –  Jordão Feb 28 '11 at 15:30
    
Off-topic: Why can't you do arguments.slice(1) ? –  Bart van Heukelom Oct 27 '11 at 9:46
1  
@Bart van Heukelom: because arguments is not an instance of Array, but behaves like one. As such, it doesn't have the slice method on its prototype. –  Jordão Oct 27 '11 at 10:44
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I did not end up finding a more straightforward solution. So my current correct answer sits at:

function applyArbitraryMethod( objects, args ) {
    objects = objects.split(/\./);
    var method = window;
    for( var i in objects ) method = method[objects[i]];
    method.apply( this, args );
}
share|improve this answer

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