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I'm making a Drag and Drop JavaScript engine. I learned how to set a bounding box as the parent element. However, now I wish to set the bounding box to any parent of any parent, or as the entire page (bound-less).

Right now my Javascript Engine looks like:

// JavaScript Document

var dragObj;

document.addEventListener("mousedown", down, false);

function down(event) {
    if(~event.target.className.search(/drag/)) {
        dragObj = makeObj(event.target);
        dragObj.element.style.zIndex="100";
        document.addEventListener("mousemove", freeMovement, false);
    }
}

function freeMovement(event) {

    if (typeof(dragObj.element.mouseup) == "undefined")
        document.addEventListener("mouseup", drop, false);
    //Prevents redundantly adding the same event handler repeatedly

    dragObj.element.style.left = Math.max(0, Math.min(event.clientX - dragObj.posX, dragObj.boundX)) + "px";
    dragObj.element.style.top = Math.max(0, Math.min(event.clientY - dragObj.posY, dragObj.boundY)) + "px";
}

function drop() {
    dragObj.element.style.zIndex="1";

    document.removeEventListener("mousemove", freeMovement, false);
    document.removeEventListener("mouseup", drop, false);
    //alert("DEBUG_DROP");
}

function makeBoundlessObj(e) {
    var obj = new Object();
    obj.element = e;

    obj.boundX = e.parentNode.offsetWidth - e.offsetWidth;
    obj.boundY = e.parentNode.offsetHeight - e.offsetHeight;

    obj.posX = event.clientX - e.offsetLeft;
    obj.posY = event.clientY - e.offsetTop;

    return obj;
}

function makeObj(e) {
    obj = new Object();
    obj.element = e;

    obj.boundX = e.parentNode.offsetWidth - e.offsetWidth;
    obj.boundY = e.parentNode.offsetHeight - e.offsetHeight;

    obj.posX = event.clientX - e.offsetLeft;
    obj.posY = event.clientY - e.offsetTop;

    var curleft = curtop = 0;
    if (e.offsetParent) {
        do {
            curleft += e.offsetLeft;
            curtop += e.offsetTop;
            //alert(e.id + ":" + e.innerHTML);
            if(~e.className.search(/bound/)) {
                obj.boundX = curleft - obj.element.offsetLeft;
                obj.boundY = curtop - obj.element.offsetTop;
                return obj;
            }

        } while (e = e.offsetParent);
    }

    return obj;
}

function findPos(obj) { // Donated by `lwburk` on StackOverflow
    var curleft = curtop = 0;
    if (obj.offsetParent) {
        do {
            curleft += obj.offsetLeft;
            curtop += obj.offsetTop;
        } while (obj = obj.offsetParent);
        return { x: curleft, y: curtop };
    }
}

My CSS is as follows:

@charset "utf-8";
/* CSS Document */


* {
    padding: 0px;
    margin: 0px;
}

.drag {
    position: absolute;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    user-select: none;
}

.bound {
    position: relative;
}

.square {
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
    background: red;
    cursor:move;
}

#center {
    width: 500px;
    height: 300px;
    margin: auto;
    margin-top: 50px;
    background-color:#ccc;
    text-align: center;
    border-radius: 25px;
    -moz-border-radius: 25px;
}

#box {
    background-color: #FF3;
    height: 278px;
    border-radius: 0 0 25px 25px;
    -moz-border-radius: 0 0 25px 25px;
    opacity: 0.5;
}

And my HTML is pretty clean:

<div id="center">
    <h1>Hello World! <hr /></h1>
    <div id="box" class="bound">
        <p class="drag square"> One </p>
        <p class="drag square"> Two </p>
    </div>
</div>

I've attempted to make the proper functions multiple times. I'll give one that I've made which doesn't work, and I'll list why:

  1. If it doesn't have bounds, I set the default bounds as the parent element (because I don't know how to set bounds as the entire page)

  2. If one of the parent elements IS a bound, then I am not setting the bound coordinates correctly (again, I don't know how)

Oh, and I set the bounds while I create the drag_object.

JavaScript creation function:

function makeObj(e) {
    var obj = new Object();
    obj.element = e;

    obj.boundX = e.parentNode.offsetWidth - e.offsetWidth;
    obj.boundY = e.parentNode.offsetHeight - e.offsetHeight;

    obj.posX = event.clientX - e.offsetLeft;
    obj.posY = event.clientY - e.offsetTop;

    var curleft = curtop = 0;
    if (e.offsetParent) {
        do {
            curleft += e.offsetLeft;
            curtop += e.offsetTop;
            //alert(e.id + ":" + e.innerHTML);
            if(~e.className.search(/bound/)) {
                obj.boundX = curleft - obj.element.offsetLeft;
                obj.boundY = curtop - obj.element.offsetTop;
                return obj;
            }

        } while (e = e.offsetParent);
    }

    return obj;
}

What is the correct math for setting the bounding box and why? Can I get rid of the position: relative in the .bound class? Can I make .drag class not position: absolute? I know all of these things will probably greatly affect how the bounding function is written. If I had to choose between having the .drag class or the .bound class not need a certain type of position, I would choose that the .bound class be set to any kind of positioning.

Thank you all for reading and helping! It means a lot to me; I'm a full time (boarding) high school student with very little free time =/

EDIT:

I should note that I'm on my tenth day of learning Javascript- or fifteenth-hour depending on how you look at it, and I would like to learn the language before I start using libraries like jQuery. This engine is an academic exercise I've made for myself for the sake of knowledge and learning the language =]

share|improve this question
3  
+1 - definitely a worthy goal to learn JavaScript yourself rather than relying on libraries. However, you can probably learn a lot from deconstructing the source of the jQuery UI draggable library (which I know specifically supports setting any element to be a bounding box). Most of the code in jQuery UI is pretty clear if you can read JS, so it may help you along the way: jqueryui.com/demos/draggable/#constrain-movement –  Tim Medora Mar 1 '11 at 4:30
    
@Tim thanks. I was actually thinking about reading about how different libraries did it, but when I look at other people's code, I have no idea what's going on. I don't know enough JavaScript yet. However, the last time I looked at someone's version of "drag and drop" was before I wrote a line of my own code, so it's quite possible that link will come in handy. If only code was heavily commented! Also, those libraries may help me with how I structure the code. I want to implement the engine so that it's easy to use. –  Dbz Mar 1 '11 at 4:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted
+50

The first thing I noticed is that you didn't have a minimum boundary. You'll need that in order to enforce the upper AND lower bound.

What is the correct math for setting the bounding box and why?

First thing is that dragObj needs to account for both boundaries (applies to position: absolute):

// parentNode is our bounding box
// the minimum boundary is based on the top left corner of our container
obj.minBoundX = e.parentNode.offsetLeft;
obj.minBoundY = e.parentNode.offsetTop;

// the maximum is the bottom right corner of the container
// or.. the top left (x,y) + the height and width (h,y) - the size of the square
obj.maxBoundX = obj.minBoundX + e.parentNode.offsetWidth - e.offsetWidth;
obj.maxBoundY = obj.minBoundY + e.parentNode.offsetHeight - e.offsetHeight;

Enforcing the boundaries is a simple update to freeMovement:

dragObj.element.style.left = Math.max(dragObj.minBoundX, Math.min(event.clientX - dragObj.posX, dragObj.maxBoundX)) + "px";
dragObj.element.style.top = Math.max(dragObj.minBoundY, Math.min(event.clientY - dragObj.posY, dragObj.maxBoundY)) + "px";

Can I get rid of the position: relative in the .bound class? Yup.

Can I make .drag class not position: absolute? Yup. You'll just want to change your positions to be relative and your calculations to account for this. For example, your minimum bound will now be 0.

// parentNode is our bounding box
// the minimum boundary is based on the top left corner of our container
obj.minBoundX = 0;
obj.minBoundY = 0;

Here is the JSFiddle for the position:absolute version: http://jsfiddle.net/feWcQ/ (works with Firefox 4). I also added two tiny boxes that show your boundaries. Hopefully my answer helps you!

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you sooooo much! I'm going to look through everything to make sure I understand it. –  Dbz Mar 4 '11 at 2:53
    
So, I have a bunch of questions! It appears the bounding box is set to be the parent element by default. Before I was preforming a check to find the correct parent element to use as a bounding box. Can I still do that? -Even if there is any type of position set (and how)? Also, how do I account for setting the .drag and .bound class to any type of positioning? What's the math like? –  Dbz Mar 4 '11 at 3:12
    
Sure you can still do that! You probably want to check object.style.position and then perform your calculations. When it is relative, then minBoundX and minBoundY would be 0 (as I have above). –  Kit Menke Mar 4 '11 at 3:51
    
So @Kit, how do I get from here jsfiddle.net/yJVtH to allowing different types of positioning in the math? Can you add in comments to the jsfiddle I just posted showing me where I need to adjust for different types of positioning? –  Dbz Mar 6 '11 at 3:02
    
Here is an updated one: jsfiddle.net/yJVtH/3. I made a couple of changes so take a look. I also think your math won't change like I thought it would. The only thing you need to figure out is a better findPos function that can account for relative/absolute positioning of the bounding element. For that, I definitely would recommend looking at how jQuery or prototype.js does it because there are a lot of quirks.. especially across browsers. –  Kit Menke Mar 6 '11 at 19:57

So, before I take a stab, I'd strongly recommend the book by OReilly, "Definitive Guide to JavaScript". I learned a ton in there (and subsequently forgot it when I didnt have to use it every day).

So there's a lot of ways to skin this cat, but I the hardest part is to get the positions of the relevant things in a cross-browser way without using a library. I don't actually recall the exact syntax (so I won't try) but basically what you'll need to do is find the bounding box's position and the dragged element's position using this formula: http://blog.firetree.net/2005/07/04/javascript-find-position/ and then account for element widths and so on to stay inside the boxes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the book recommendation. I'll take a look into obtaining it. As for the algorithm the link gives, I have a very similar function (last one in the engine) already called findPos(). It's 12AM here now, so I'll read the entire webpage in-depth tomorrow. Thank you! =] –  Dbz Mar 1 '11 at 4:55

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