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I have both Stephen Kochan's Programming in Objective C published in 2003 and Programming in Objective-C 2.0 (2nd Edition) published in 2009. Both are excellent books, and I am refreshing my Obj C skills.

In both editions, there is a listing for the Fraction with Classes program. It is listing 3.4 in the first edition, listing 3.2 in the second edition.

Here is listing 3.4 from the first edition:

#import <stdio.h>
#import <objc/Object.h>
///Interface section
@interface Fraction: Object
{
    int numerator;
    int denominator;
}

-(void) print;
-(void) setNumerator: (int) n;
-(void) setDenominator: (int) d;
-(id)init;

@end

//Implementation section

@implementation Fraction;
-(void) print
{
    printf(" %i/%i", numerator, denominator);
}

-(void) setNumerator:(int)n
{
    numerator=n;
}

-(void) setDenominator:(int)d
{
    denominator=d;
}

-(int) numerator {
    return numerator;
}

-(int) denominator {
    return denominator;
}

@end   //Implementation

// Program section
int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    Fraction *myFraction;

    myFraction=[Fraction alloc];
    myFraction=[Fraction init];

    [myFraction setNumerator:1];
    [myFraction setDenominator:3];

    printf("The value is:");
    [myFraction print];
    printf("\n");

    [myFraction free];

    return 0;
}

The second edition became much more Apple/OS X centric. Instead of focusing on GCC, the text is more focused on xcode. Instead of the generic objc/Object.h import, the listing were translated to use the OS X Foundation class framework.

Here is listing 3.4 from the second edition:

// program to work with fractions - class version  

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>  

//---- @interface section ----  

@interface Fraction: NSObject  
{  
    int numerator;  
    int denominator;  
}  

-(void) print;  
-(void) setNumerator: (int) n;  
-(void) setDenominator: (int) d;  

@end  

//----@implementation section ----  

@implementation Fraction  
-(void) print  
{  
    NSLog (@"%i/%i", numerator, denominator);  
}  

-(void) setNumerator: (int) n  
{  
    numerator = n;  
}  

-(void) setDenominator: (int) d  
{  
    denominator = d;  
}  

@end  

//---- program section ----  

int main (int argc, char *argv[])  
{  
    NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];  

    Fraction *myFraction;  

    // Create an instance of a fraction  

    myFraction = [Fraction alloc];  
    myFraction = [myFraction init];  

    // Set fraction to 1/3  

    [myFraction setNumerator: 1];  
    [myFraction setDenominator: 3];  

    // Display the fraction using print method  

    NSLog (@"The value of myFraction is:");  
    [myFraction print];  
    [myFraction release];  

    [pool drain];  
    return 0;  
}   

Of course the older version does not compile on the newer XCODE, and I do not find that terribly surprising. However, the older edition code no longer runs if compiled on recent versions of GCC on Linux or Windows.

The specific run-time error is init method not found but the Kochan book states that the init method need not be defined on a class derived from Object. Indeed you do not need to define -init -alloc or free on NSObject but gcc 4.2.1 warns that they are not defined for Object. I am assuming that this code could be successfully compiled and executed when Kochan put out his first book. The Foundation classes and NSObject, I believe, are Apple only.

I can compile and run 30 year-old C code, but 7 year old Objective C is not longer useable? Has Objective C, essentially, become an Apple only language with no real support outside of Apple only compilers and technologies? That is the question.

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3 Answers 3

Object is in one library, NSObject is in Apple's and GNUStep's library. It isn't a matter of the language changing to be no longer backward compatible, it is a matter of using a different library.

The language has changed, but only by adding, not removing. The libraries have changed, though.

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I used $ gcc file -o prog -l objc which I believe is the correct library, no? This is, again, what is in Kochan's first book... –  dawg Feb 27 '11 at 2:14

The Foundation classes and NSObject, I believe, are Apple only.

That's not correct.

"NSObject" is the base class for the OPENSTEP API circa 1994, and later Cocoa. You would have only used "Object" if you needed to support pre-OPENSTEP NeXT systems, so it's surprising that it would be used in a book published in 2003.

For OPENSTEP/GnuSTEP/Cocoa development you use "NSObject".

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The older code does in fact compile with MacOSX's gcc, with a warning:

~$ gcc frac.m -framework Foundation
frac.m:43: warning: incomplete implementation of class ‘Fraction’
frac.m:43: warning: method definition for ‘-init’ not found

and gives a runtime error when run. But this is linking to Apple's runtime. What are you linking to on linux or windows ?

[added] As noted in the comments, in version 1, -init is declared and called, but not implemented. If you comment out the line where it's declared and the line where it's called, it will compile and run (on macosx with gcc):

~$ cc  frac1.m -l objc
~$ ./a.out 
The value is: 1/3
share|improve this answer
    
You need to implement the init method in your class. You only declared it. –  Rasmus Styrk Feb 27 '11 at 7:44
    
@Rasmus Styrk: The init and alloc methods are not implemented in this class and are supposed to then go to the parent's class method -- in this case Object for the older code and NSObject for the new code. –  dawg Mar 5 '11 at 18:07
    
sure my bad :-) –  Rasmus Styrk Mar 7 '11 at 9:59

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