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How can I pipe the output of a command into my clipboard and paste it back when using a terminal? For instance:

cat file | clipboard
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possible duplicate of Pipe to/from Clipboard –  Ciro Santilli Aug 13 at 9:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 117 down vote accepted

I always wanted to do this and found a nice and easy way of doing it. I wrote down the complete procedure just in case anyone else needs it.

First install a 16kB program called xclip:

sudo apt-get install xclip

You can then pipe the output into xclip to be copied into the clipboard:

cat file | xclip

To paste the text you just copied, you shall use:

xclip -o

To simplify life, you can setup an alias in your .bashrc file as I did:

alias "c=xclip"
alias "v=xclip -o"

To see how useful this is, imagine I want to open my current path in a new terminal window (there may be other ways of doing it like Ctrl+T on some systems but this is just for illustration purposes):

Terminal 1:
pwd | c

Terminal 2:
cd `v`

Notice the ` ` around v. This executes v as a command first and then substitutes it in-place for cd to use.

UPDATE from @khotyn:

cat file | xclip` only copies the content to the 'X' clipboard, if you want to paste somewhere else other than a 'X' application, try this one: 

cat file | xclip -selection clipboard
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11  
"cat file | xclip" only copy the content to the 'X' clipboard, if you want to paste somewhere else other than a 'X' application, try this one: "cat file | xclip -selection clipboard" –  khotyn Feb 27 '11 at 3:09
    
@khotyn: +1 Thanks. I added it to my answer. –  Legend Feb 27 '11 at 7:28
2  
Your choice of handle is appropriate! –  Matt Joiner Feb 28 '11 at 2:23
    
El awesomeness! My Thunar now has copy absolute path to clipboard. ;) –  Alix Axel May 31 '13 at 14:53
    
If you want to remove the newline character so that you can directly paste and edit the result of "pwd | c", you can do "pwd | tr -d '\n' | xclip -selection c" –  Anake Jun 6 '13 at 17:43

On OS X, use pbcopy . pbpaste goes in the opposite direction.

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2  
Yups! Just like this for ex: pbcopy < .ssh/id_rsa.pub –  doublejosh May 3 '11 at 19:35
    
doesn't work for command output tho - e.g. pbcopy < git merge-base master some-branch –  Ben Grunfeld Sep 17 at 21:29

For people who are still interested on this subject. I wrote this little script that takes the guess work out of the copy/paste commands.

The Linux version of the script relies on xclip being already installed in your system. The script is called clipboard.

#!/bin/bash
# Linux version
# Use this script to pipe in/out of the clipboard
#
# Usage: someapp | clipboard     # Pipe someapp's output into clipboard
#        clipboard | someapp     # Pipe clipboard's content into someapp
#

if command -v xclip 1>/dev/null; then
    if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]] ; then
        # stdin is a pipe
        # stdin -> clipboard
        xclip -i -selection clipboard
    else
        # stdin is not a pipe
        # clipboard -> stdout
        xclip -o -selection clipboard
    fi
else
    echo "Remember to install xclip"
fi

The OS X version of the script relies on pbcopy and pbpaste which are preinstalled on all macs.

#!/bin/bash
# OS X version
# Use this script to pipe in/out of the clipboard
#
# Usage: someapp | clipboard     # Pipe someapp's output into clipboard
#        clipboard | someapp     # Pipe clipboard's content into someapp
#

if [[ -p /dev/stdin ]] ; then
    # stdin is a pipe
    # stdin -> clipboard
    pbcopy
else
    # stdin is not a pipe
    # clipboard -> stdout
    pbpaste
fi

Using the script is very simple since you simply pipe in or out of clipboard as shown is these two examples.

$ cat file | clipboard

$ clipboard | less

Enjoy

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I use the names pbcopy and pbpaste on Linux so it works for both Linux and OS X. –  StackedCrooked Jan 17 at 14:50

I made a small tool providing similar functionality, without using xclip or xsel. stdout is copied to a clipboard and can be pasted again in the terminal. See:

https://sourceforge.net/projects/commandlinecopypaste/

Note, that this tool does not need an X-session. The clipboard can just be used within the terminal and has not to be pasted by Ctrl+V or middle-mouse-click into other X-windows.

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"While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes." –  zero323 Nov 11 '13 at 20:33

It is much easier. Press Shift + Ctrl + C for copy. And Shift + Ctrl + V for paste.

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