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I want to know how can I manipulate all the links on a page with javascript. I can get elements by id's with document.getElementById(id), but how can I get the links? And also how can i get all elements with a certain classname? I want to change the color of the link and class elements.

I mean these links:

<a href="http://www.google.com">This is a link</a>

And an example for an element with a class:

<span class="link">This is an element with a class</span>

Please no jquery. I want javascript.

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4  
(jQuery is JavaScript -- in any case, the same applies -- set the style/class/or-other-selector of the element and use CSS. In fact, there is no JavaScript required with CSS... there is no trivial way to get all elements with a given class, but you can get all elements with a given "tag name" (hint) -- it's a standard DOM method -- and then iterate those with the appropriate conditional. If you don't want to use jQuery, I would look at the W3C DOM specification for the "standard" DOM functions and then quirksmode to find out all the different ways they really work.) –  user166390 Feb 27 '11 at 4:12
    
See the update to my answer. I provided a link that demonstrates what you are trying to do. –  JasCav Feb 27 '11 at 4:17

4 Answers 4

Simple and straightforward (in pure JS too!)

colorLinks("#00FF00");

function colorLinks(hex)
{
    var links = document.getElementsByTagName("a");
    for(var i=0;i<links.length;i++)
    {
        if(links[i].href)
        {
            links[i].style.color = hex;  
        }
    }  
}

If it's a class name you're looking for and you know the tag, just use this.

var elements = document.getElementsByTagName("span");
for(var j=0;j<elements.length;j++)
{
    if(elements[j].className === "your class here")
    {
        //do something
    }  
}

You can also look at getElementsByClassName and querySelectorAll. Both have support in most new browsers.

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Thanks, this is working perfectly, and it's exactly what I was looking for. How can i get the classes? –  Maxxon Feb 27 '11 at 4:17
    
I've added a quick example for you regarding classes. –  user1385191 Feb 27 '11 at 4:21
    
I just want to get the elements with a class name, like: <div class="im_looking_for_all_elements_with_this_class_name">hello</div> Is that possible? –  Maxxon Feb 27 '11 at 4:25
    
In that case, you'd substitute "span" for "div" in my snippet and then place the class you're looking for in place of "im_looking_for_all_elements_with_this_class_name". –  user1385191 Feb 27 '11 at 4:27
    
if (links[i].href)... is unneeded. It's against standards to use href= attributes for elements other than <a>. –  Blender Feb 27 '11 at 4:29

The pure-JavaScript version isn't all that complicated:

var elements = document.getElementsByTagName('a');

for (var i = 0; i < elements.length; i++) {
    if (elements.className.split(/\s+/).indexOf('red') !== -1) {
        elements[i].style.color = 'red';
    }
}

And for modern browsers:

var elements = document.querySelectorAll('a.red');

[].slice.call(elements).forEach(function(elem) {
    elem.style.color = 'red';
});
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly this, changing colors. But can you write the pure javascript version? How can i get a's with js? –  Maxxon Feb 27 '11 at 4:14
    
An error on the loop, should be:for (var i = 0; i < document.getElementsByTagName('a').length; i++) –  SadullahCeran Feb 27 '11 at 4:16
    
By the way, that doesn't find all of the links. A link is an element with a "href" attribute. –  user1385191 Feb 27 '11 at 4:17
    
I fixed the loop thing, and added a class selector. @Matt, is it valid (X)HTML to add href attributes to elements besides <a>? –  Blender Feb 27 '11 at 4:20

You can use document.getElementsByTagName("a"). This function returns an array of the <a> elements in the page. Loop over this array, and use .style.color = "#000000" in each element.

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Update: I still recommend using jQuery, but, if you want to learn how to do it without, I would recommend heading over to this site. This shows how to change link colors when you mouse over the link, but you can easily extrapolate for your specific situation: Javascript Change Link Text Color onmouseover

--

Ottomanlast has a good point about checking out jQuery to help you out with this task (although it can be done without the use of a library). However, just so you have an example of what he is talking about, here is how you could change link colors using jQuery.

$('.linkClass').click(function(){
      $(this).css('color', 'green');
});

This example changes the color of a specific link when it is clicked.

$('a').css('color', 'green');

This example will change all the links to a green color.

$('.linkClass').click(function(){
      $(this).removeClass('oldClass');
      $(this).addClass('newClass');
});

This does the same thing as the first example, but this removes and adds CSS classes that you already have defined elsewhere. (I would recommend this method over just editing the CSS directly.)

Anyway, the point I'm trying to make is that jQuery makes it extremely easy to select and then make changes to the objects within your HTML document. You may want to take a look into it.

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I know about jQuery, but I'd like to know how the pure js works, it's not so much more complicated than jquery so why not learn pure js instead? Thanks anyway, the guys who will read this question in the future might find this answer helpful. –  Maxxon Feb 27 '11 at 4:20
    
@Maxxon - No problem. Sorry it didn't answer your exact question. However, one thing - doing "pure JavaScript" (which, jQuery is JavaScript) can be significantly more difficult than just using jQuery. Not from a language standpoint, but from a development time, compatibility, etc standpoint. It's the reason why many developers don't even consider doing JavaScript w/out jQuery (or a similar library). Check out this awesome post by Addy Osman (and others) about jQuery vs. Vanilla JS - addyosmani.com/blog/javascriptuncovered –  JasCav Feb 27 '11 at 4:39

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