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So I have my main class here, where basically creates a new jframe and adds a world object to it. The world object is basically where all drawing and keylistening would take place...

public class Blobs extends JFrame{

    public Blobs() {
        super("Blobs :) - By Chris Tanaka");
        setVisible(true);
        setResizable(false);
        setSize(1000, 1000);
        setIgnoreRepaint(true);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        add(new World());
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Blobs();
    }
}

How exactly would you get key input from the world class? (So far I have my world class extending a jpanel and implementing a keylistener. In the constructor i addKeyListener(this). I also have these methods since they are auto implemented:

public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) {
    if (e.getKeyCode() == KeyEvent.VK_W)
        System.out.println("Hi");
}

public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {}
public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {}

However this does not seem to work?

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Can we see World class ? –  Bala R Feb 27 '11 at 5:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a great time to utilize an Observer if you wanted to inform "observing classes" that a KeyPress event occurred in your world class. The structure would like something like this:

public interface Observer
{ 
   public void update(KeyEvent keyEvent);
}

public interface Observable
{
   public void NotifyObservers(KeyEvent keyEvent);
}

public class World implements KeyListener, Observable
{
   private ArrayList<Observer> obsList;

   public World()
   {
      obsList = new ArrayList();
   }

   public void keyPressed(KeyEvent e) 
   {
      NotifyObservers(e);
   }

   public void keyReleased(KeyEvent e) {}
   public void keyTyped(KeyEvent e) {}

   public void NotifyObservers(KeyEvent keyEvent)
   {
       for(Observer obs : obsList)
       {
           obs.update(keyEvent);
       }
   }

   public void AddObserver(Observer obs)
   {
       if (obs != null)
          obsList.add(obs);
   }

   public void DelObserver(Observer obs)
   {
       if (obs != null)
          obsList.remove(obs);
   }
}

public class Blobs extends JFrame implements Observer
{

    public Blobs() 
    {
        super("Blobs :) - By Chris Tanaka");

        //Register this instance of Blobs as an observer that is stored in the World's
        //obsList ArrayList field
        World world = new World();
        world.addObserver(this);

        setResizable(false);
        setSize(1000, 1000);
        setIgnoreRepaint(true);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        getContentPane().add(world);
        this.addKeyListener(world);
        setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Blobs();
    }

    public void update(KeyEvent keyEvent)
    {
       //do whatever here when key event occurs
    }
}

SO the end result here is that you can make Any class that implements the Observer interface part of the obsList I defined. Then when a keyevent occurs it will invoke the NotifyObservers() method which iterates through the list and invokes the update() method in the Observing class.

EDIT:

You can have both the World and Battle classes handling key events in their own ways if you so desired.

public class Battle implements Observer
{

   public void update(KeyEvent e)
   {
      // do processing here
   }
}

public class Blobs implements Observer
{
   public void update(KeyEvent e)
   {
      // do processing here
   }
}

You would just need to at some point add battle as an observer to your World class like I did in Blobs

worldInstance.addObserver(new Battle());

In addition, if you wanted to use flags to only allow certain classes to process keyevents then you could simply update the interface to allow passing the flag to the update method as so:

public interface Observer
{
   public void update(object isFor, KeyEvent e);
}

then you Observer update methods would have this kind of flow:

public class Battle 
{
   public void update(object flag, KeyEvent e)
   {
        if (flag instanceof Battle)
        {
            //now do your work
        }
   }
}

This also means updating the notify method in the Observable interface and implementor

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@Chris If you have any questions about how this whole thing works please let me know. Once you understand some of the finer points it all makes sense and makes life much easier for passing on event driven logic to other classes for processing. –  Feisty Mango Feb 27 '11 at 5:40
    
I have been looking over this code and it seems to my understanding that with your solution i would have to place all of my code in which keypresses are handled in my main Blobs class? Also just to be more specific what I want is to have my World class handle all my world movement of my character (paint and keypress handling) and a battle class which handles separate keyhandling and drawing. In other words I would like to be able to do Battle battle = new Battle() in my World class and once the battle is over control would resume back to the World. –  Bob Mar 7 '11 at 10:22
    
@Chris incorrect about the assumption of all key handling being processed in Blobs class. They beauty of observers is that you could have more than one. Look at the edit above. –  Feisty Mango Mar 7 '11 at 16:03

If your Worls class implements KeyListener, then one way to do what you are trying to do is to change Blobs constructor like this,

 public Blobs() {
        super("Blobs :) - By Chris Tanaka");
        setVisible(true);
        setResizable(false);
        setSize(1000, 1000);
        setIgnoreRepaint(true);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        World world = new World();
        getContentPane().add(world);
        this.addKeyListener(world);
        setVisible(true);
 }
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And make sure that world is focusable. (don't know if it is by default) –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Feb 27 '11 at 5:17

IT doesn't work because by default JPanels don't get the focus. It could be solved by setting its focusable property to true and requesting the focus.

But having said that, I think that it's important that your JPanel class not implement a listener interface as you're much better off using an anonymous inner class for your listener. You may even be better off using key bindings and not a key listener, but I can't tell based on the data that has been so far presented.

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