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Quesition:

Given input like this:

int myintsA[]={1,3,3,2,2,5,5,5,4};
int myintsB[]={0,9,8,6,7,3,3,4};

Find same elements, out put it. When they appear both 2 times. out put it as 2 times.

For example:
Output: {3,3,4}

   #include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <ext/hash_map>

using namespace __gnu_cxx;
using namespace std;

list<int> findDup(const vector<int>& A ,const vector<int>& B)
{
    list<int> idx;
    std::vector<int>::size_type i = 0;
    std::vector<int>::size_type j = 0;
    while(i < A.size() && j < B.size()) {
        if (A[i] == B[j])
        {
            idx.push_back(A[i]);
            i++;
            j++;
        }
        else if(A[i] < B[j])
        {
            i++;
        }
        else if (A[i] > B[j])
        {
            j++;
        }
    }
    return idx;

}

int main()
{
    int myintsA[]={1,3,2,2,5,5,5,4};
    int myintsB[]={0,9,8,6,7,3,3,4};

    vector<int> myvectorA (myintsA, myintsA + sizeof(myintsA) / sizeof(int) );
    vector<int> myvectorB (myintsB, myintsB + sizeof(myintsB) / sizeof(int) );


    sort(myvectorA.begin(),myvectorA.end());
    sort(myvectorB.begin(),myvectorB.end());

    list<int> result = findDup(myvectorA, myvectorB);
    for(list<int>::iterator iter = result.begin(); iter!=result.end();++iter)
    {
        printf("%c",*iter);
    }
    return 0;
}

But my program seems wrong. need help! THank you!

share|improve this question
    
It's usually more idiomatic to print out the output using cout << *iter; as compared with printf("%c",*iter); –  shuttle87 Feb 27 '11 at 5:57
3  
Where's the return in findDup()? –  chrisaycock Feb 27 '11 at 5:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a working version of the code posted from earlier:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <algorithm> //It's better to use the standard <algorithm> header here for sort.
                     //using <ext/hash_map> just for the sort functionality is not a great idea because it makes the code less clear and also creates portability issues.
using namespace __gnu_cxx;
using namespace std;

list<int> findDup(const vector<int>& A ,const vector<int>& B)
{
    list<int> idx;
    std::vector<int>::size_type i = 0;
    std::vector<int>::size_type j = 0;
    while(i < A.size() && j < B.size()) { //as pointed out before this is the source of the error
        if (A.at(i) == B.at(j)) 
        //using the .at(i) will throw an exception if anything goes out of range of the container. 
        //Operator [] doesn't provide this safety.
        {
            idx.push_back(A.at(i));
            i++;
            j++;
        }
        else if(A.at(i) < B.at(j))
        {
            i++;
        }
        else if (A.at(i) > B.at(j))
        {
            j++;
        }
    }

    return idx; 
    //you didn't actually return anything before

}

int main()
{
    int myintsA[]={1,3,3,2,2,5,5,5,4};
    int myintsB[]={0,9,8,6,7,3,3,4};

    vector<int> myvectorA (myintsA, myintsA + sizeof(myintsA) / sizeof(int) );
    vector<int> myvectorB (myintsB, myintsB + sizeof(myintsB) / sizeof(int) );


    sort(myvectorA.begin(),myvectorA.end());
    sort(myvectorB.begin(),myvectorB.end());

    list<int> result = findDup(myvectorA, myvectorB);
    for(list<int>::iterator iter = result.begin(); iter!=result.end();++iter)
    {
        cout<< *iter ; 
        //using cout is generally safer and more idiomatic c++
    }
            cout << endl;

    return 0;
}

The main issue is the edge case that happens at the end. A few things to note: If you used the .at(i) syntax you would have got a std::out_of_range thrown which would have pointed you in the right direction to finding the problem. Also if you compiled with -Wall you would have been warned about the first function not returning anything.

share|improve this answer
    
@shuttle87: I don't see any need for hash_map or the header for it; removing it will make the code more portable. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:10
    
@shuttle87: It also needs the output format fixed. Otherwise, I believe you have fixed all of the bugs. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:10
    
@Jeremiah Willcock, agree, the hash_map include is a strange thing to have included at all. It's there for the sort functionality but that really should be from algorithm and not this non-standard header. I will edit this. –  shuttle87 Feb 27 '11 at 6:14
    
@shuttle87: I didn't see that <algorithm> was missing until you posted that. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:16
    
@Jeremiah Willcock, yeah it compiles without it because there is a sort in <ext/hash_map> . I removed <ext/hash_map> and got an error from sort not being declared, otherwise I too would not have noticed at a glance what was going on. –  shuttle87 Feb 27 '11 at 6:20

The findDup function has a boundary condition error: what if one of i or j is at the end, but the other isn't? Your loop will continue, accessing beyond the end of the vector. For what you are doing, you should just be able to change the loop condition to (i != A.size()) && (j != B.size()) (changing || to &&).

Another issue is that the %c format is for characters; %d is for ints, and there will be strange results on your terminal if you use %c. You should also print (assuming you want the format you show in the question) a left brace at the beginning of the output list, commas between output numbers, and a right-brace and newline at the end.

@Tim's answer is also correct; you have that typo in your code as well.

share|improve this answer
    
i changed those error you pointed out. But still got seg fault. –  Josh Morrison Feb 27 '11 at 6:06
    
@Andy: Did you fix all of the issues that were in the other answers as well (other than the sizeof thing; you have that correct now)? Could you please update the code in the question? –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:07
    
@Andy: Actually, see @chrisaycock's comment about a missing return statement; that is likely why you have a seg fault. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:07
    
thank you Jeremiah, I got it~ –  Josh Morrison Feb 27 '11 at 6:12
    else if(A[i] < B[i])

I assume you meant:

    else if(A[i] < B[j])  // B uses j, not i

that could be the cause of your infinite loop.

Edit: And as Jeremiah points out, your while condition is messed up. Normal practice looks more like this:

while(i < A.size() && j < B.size()) {
share|improve this answer
    
thank you man. I changed what you pointed out, but still got seg fault –  Josh Morrison Feb 27 '11 at 6:06
    
Thank you !..... –  Josh Morrison Feb 27 '11 at 6:12

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