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I wrote the following function as a part of a jQuery plugin I am developing:

$.fn.append2 = function(collection, callback) {
    var $this = this;

    $.each(collection, function(key, value) {
        $this.append(callback ? callback(key, value) : value);
    });

    return this;
};

After testing a highly recursive function that heavily depended on .append2, I optimized .append2 to:

$.fn.append2 = function(collection, callback) {
    var $this = this;

    $.each(collection, callback
        ? function(key, value) { $this.append(callback(key,value)); }
        : function(key, value) { $this.append(value); }
    );

    return this;
};

While this code is more efficient in terms of speed, it still left me unsatisfied. I have, essentially, defined the same function twice:

function(key, value) { $this.append(callback(key,value)); }
function(key, value) { $this.append(value); }

And I wondered if there is any language that lets me defined the function only once as:

function(key, value) { $this.append(value); }

And then operate on it by replacing the argument to $this.append from value to callback(key, value). (And, no, not by manipulating strings. By manipulating the function itself.)

Is there any such programming language?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Any homoiconic language lets you do this do some degree or another. All of the Lisp languages let you build functions procedurally out of bits and pieces and then invoke them as normally. The Io language is rare in that I believe it will let you go the other way: given a function, you can pull apart its source code and manipulate it.

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Hm... the answer is kind of yes and kind of no. If you want to modify the function itself, then I don't believe that's possible, because the function is just binary data. But you might want to look into Scheme: everything in Scheme is a "list" (including the body of a function), and as long as you haven't evaluated the body, you can change it as will. Take a look at eval for more info.

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1  
Wow. That is a bit too far (and potentially unsafe). I just want to plug in a function (in my question, callback) between the caller and callee functions. Read my last comment to Jeremiah's answer for more information. –  Eduardo León Feb 27 '11 at 6:32
    
@Eduardo: As for "plugging in a function between the caller and callee", have a look at advice in, say, (Emacs) Lisp and at the concept of aspect-oriented programming. –  imz -- Ivan Zakharyaschev Mar 3 '11 at 14:21

Many languages have reflection to the level that they allow replacement of arguments and such (including Java, C#, Smalltalk, and Ruby, I believe). However, there are separation of concerns issues when you have one part of the program mutating another. You could put a default value for callback that just returns value; that would be a more elegant solution that would remove the conditional expression.

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I have also considered that, but that would still be inelegant, since I would be forced to define the identity function. However, that issue could be overcome by treating a null function as the identity function. (Indeed, in lambda calculus, identity functions just "blow themselves up", passing the "control" to the next element.) –  Eduardo León Feb 27 '11 at 6:19
    
@Eduardo: What would be wrong with a default argument? Using null to mean the identity would mean needing an explicit test, while a default would allow every case to be treated like the callback case. –  Jeremiah Willcock Feb 27 '11 at 6:22
    
True. I have come up with another possibility. The hypothetical language could treat the passing of an argument as a linked-list-like data structure (A->B, where A is the part of the caller function that "puts" an argument and B is the part of the callee function that "pops" the argument). Then, you could insert a function C in the middle of the linked-list-like data structure (A->C->B), so it's actually C which "pops" A's passed argument and only then C "pushes" the result as an argument for B. –  Eduardo León Feb 27 '11 at 6:28
    
Oh, and by treating null as the identity function, I meant that null(a) should return a. –  Eduardo León Feb 27 '11 at 6:34

The crux of the matter is this expression:

callback
    ? function(key, value) { $this.append(callback(key,value)); }
    : function(key, value) { $this.append(value); }

In Mathematica, you could (roughly) re-express this as follows:

Function[{key, value}, Append[this, callback[key, value]]] /.
  HoldPattern[callback[_, v_]] /; callback === undefined :> v

... bearing in mind that this and undefined have no special meaning in Mathematica. Without getting into details, this expression first defines a function that unconditionally calls callback. It then transforms the body of that function to simply use value if an only if callback has the value undefined. In idiomatic Mathematica there are easier ways to handle such a simple case, but it illustrates the requested capability and is a useful tool in more complex situations.

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As for your desire to "plug in a function between the caller and callee":

have a look at advice in, say, (Emacs) Lisp, and at the concept of aspect-oriented programming.

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If I'm understanding what you're looking for, possibly functors provide a solution. By manipulating the functor state/parameters, you can achieve the behaviour you describe, by changing the object/information the function operates on.

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Functions add overhead, and reducing overhead is what I'm trying to achieve. Otherwise, I would have already defined an identity function and use it as a default value for callback. –  Eduardo León Mar 2 '11 at 13:27

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