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Why inline keyword should used in the definition of member function. and Not in declaration?

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3 Answers 3

inline has some pre-historic use, but nowadays it's best to remember it as saying: "this definition is going to be defined multiple times, and that's okay."

That is, normally the one-definition rule prohibits multiple definitions of a function. This:

// foo.hpp
void foo() { /* body */ }

// a.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

// b.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

results in an error, as foo is defined in two translation units. You can declare things as often as you want. This:

// foo.hpp
void foo();

// foo.cpp
void foo()
{
    /* body */
}

// a.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

// b.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

is fine, as foo is defined once, and declared multiple times. What inline does is allow this:

// foo.hpp
inline void foo() { /* body */ }

// a.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

// b.cpp
#include "foo.hpp"

to work. It says "if you see foo more than once, just assume they are the same and be okay with it".

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+1 for not answering with the standard "hint to the compiler" response. –  JBentley Mar 29 '13 at 18:04

No, it can be used in the member function declaration also. Though msdn documentation isn't standard, it is mentioned MSDN inline. See the note part in it.

But, I learnt that it is up to the modern compilers to make a function inline or not despite explicitly mentioning inline.

class foo
{
    inline void methodOne();
};

void foo::methodOne()
{
}

IdeOne Results

Also, one can specify it both declaration and definition to have the same effect.

class foo
{
    inline void methodOne();
};

inline void foo::methodOne()  // Here keyword inline is optional. Needs to be mentioned if method declaration isn't declared inline.
{
}

IdeOne Results

Both of the above will have the same effect.

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It's because it is just a clue for the compiler to put the body of the function directly in the place where it is called. So it makes sense for the compiler to look at the place where the function is defined. So if you are inlining functions you should put the actual function code in the class header file, if you don't do this you can get linker errors.

If you'd like to know more about inlining have a look at: http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/inline-functions.html

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2  
I won't down-vote, but this use is all wrong. Most compilers basically ignore it in that fashion altogether; after all, who is the programmer to do the compilers job? –  GManNickG Feb 27 '11 at 6:55
    
Hence my very deliverate usage on the word "clue" it's only a hint to the compiler after all. –  shuttle87 Feb 27 '11 at 9:13
1  
I mean it's not even a hint, just out-right ignored in this regard. –  GManNickG Feb 27 '11 at 9:29
    
@GManNickG Why is this "hint to the compiler" answer so prevalent? It's very rare that I see an answer like yours to this kind of question. "Hint to the compiler, that it might ignore, and it might inline things anyway" doesn't even make any sense, logically (inline is redundant in this context). –  JBentley Mar 29 '13 at 18:02
1  
@JBentley: Just a time thing. inline really used to be a directive to the compiler to inline the function, then compilers got smarter so they only took it as a hint, then they got smarter than us so they just ignore it (for inlining). The "hint" perspective is a natural middle ground between "this does nothing" (wrong) and "this will inline the function" (wrong). The reason this middle ground approach is also wrong these days is that inlining is now a behavior of the compiler quality, not the language. –  GManNickG Mar 29 '13 at 18:18

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