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Within the following method, I would like to access any optional arguments that are contained within the Action:

public static class ValidatorEngine
{
    public static void Validate(Action someMethodWithOptionalArguments)
    {
        object target = someMethodWithOptionalArguments.Target;
    }
}

So if I called this method like so:

ValidatorEngine.Validate(() => UpdateByModel(model));

I would like to be able to access the model argument passed into the Action. I'm not even interested in invoking this Action.

I'm thinking that there is something that can be done with the Target property of the Action because I can see the model when debugging. I just can't figure it out programmatically.

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1  
What do you mean by "optional" arguments here? Are they optional because you've defined them with default values in the method signature or do you mean something else? And at what point are you trying to access the argument passed into the action? The method is not called until it is called and it can be called multiple times with different argument values. So I don't think it's clear what you're trying to do, or rather "when" you're trying to do it. –  Shiv Kumar Feb 27 '11 at 7:35
    
Are you ever going to execute the delegate? –  Rune FS Feb 27 '11 at 8:17
    
@Shiv "optional" arguments meaning I may call the Validate method with zero (which is unlikely) or more arguments like ValidatorEngine.Validate(() => UpdateByModel(model1, model2) or ValidatorEngine.Validate(() => UpdateByModel(model1, model2, model3) –  Gary Brunton Feb 27 '11 at 8:25
    
@Shiv I'm trying to access the argument(s) from within the Validate method. Basically the same line from my question where I have the object = target declaration. –  Gary Brunton Feb 27 '11 at 8:28
    
@Rune I will NOT execute the delegate but I'm passing it in because I want to inspect it for more information than just the arguments. –  Gary Brunton Feb 27 '11 at 8:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to inspect it but not execute it, this is a prime example for an Expression. Just change the signature from Action to Expression<Action>. This will give you an expression tree that you can analyse. For a basic example:

public static class ValidatorEngine
{
    static void Main()
    {
        string model = "abc";
        ValidatorEngine.Validate(() => UpdateByModel(model));
    }
    public static void Validate(Expression<Action> action)
    {
        var methodCall = action.Body as MethodCallExpression;
        if (methodCall == null) throw new InvalidOperationException("Expected a method-call");
        Console.WriteLine("Method: " + methodCall.Method.DeclaringType.Name + "." + methodCall.Method.Name);
        var parameters = methodCall.Method.GetParameters();
        for (int i = 0; i < parameters.Length; i++)
        {
          Console.WriteLine(parameters[i].Name + ": " + Evaluate(methodCall.Arguments[i]));
        }
    }

    static object Evaluate(Expression exp)
    {
        switch (exp.NodeType)
        {
            case ExpressionType.Constant:
                return ((ConstantExpression)exp).Value;
            case ExpressionType.MemberAccess:
                var me = (MemberExpression)exp;
                switch (me.Member.MemberType)
                {
                    case System.Reflection.MemberTypes.Field:
                        return ((FieldInfo)me.Member).GetValue(Evaluate(me.Expression));
                    case MemberTypes.Property:
                        return ((PropertyInfo)me.Member).GetValue(Evaluate(me.Expression), null);
                    default:
                        throw new NotSupportedException(me.Member.MemberType.ToString());
                }
            default:
                throw new NotSupportedException(exp.NodeType.ToString());

        }

    }
    static void UpdateByModel(object model) {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

To support a richer set of nodes and scenarios, see this richer version.

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Nice! Hope you don't mind, I modified it a bit to display the name of the parameter instead of "Arg". Also, it should be noted that an Expression tree can't contain a call to a method that has optional parameters. Not that the OP said he needed this. –  Shiv Kumar Feb 27 '11 at 9:30
    
@Shiv - the compiler message is only half-right; you can do this, but you must specify all the defaults, i.e. UpdateByMode(model, null, false, 0) would work even if the last 3 were optional. –  Marc Gravell Feb 27 '11 at 9:37
    
that's right, I guess what I was saying is you can point it to a method with optional parameters and not send in the optional parameters. It's probably something the C# team should support though. –  Shiv Kumar Feb 27 '11 at 9:46
    
@Shiv - yes, an interesting question. One for Eric, I suspect. –  Marc Gravell Feb 27 '11 at 9:54

If Marc Gravell's detailed answer does not meet your needs, the only way I can think of accomplishing what you desire is via reflection. State that is captured in a lambda closure become public fields (conveniently named the same as the captured variables) of a compiler-generated class. This class defines a method containing the contents of the lambda itself and will be the method for the Action delegate. An instance of this class will be the delegate's target.

For simplicity's sake, I'll use C# 4.0's dynamic keyword for this example. For your needs, you'd probably want to use "proper" reflection to discover the fields so you don't have to know their names in advance (plus the fact that some of the fields would be optional).

void Foo(Action action)
{
    dynamic o = action.Target;
    o.data = "ick";
    action();
}

//...

string data = "ugh";
Foo(() => Console.WriteLine(data));

The result is that "ick" is written to the console. This is how I feel about this solution. Besides the feeling this just oozes hack, the fact the type we're using here has [CompilerGenerated] slapped on it should give you pause: there is no contract between you and the compiler. Later versions of the compiler are free to change how this all works behind the scenes. Ultimately, this solution is fragile at best.

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Note: I have purposely left out any form of error checking for brevity. Obviously calling Foo with any delegate whose Target does not define a "data" field will result in an exception in this example. –  Peter Huene Feb 27 '11 at 10:13
    
+1. Hackish. Fragile. But I like! –  Christoffer Lette Feb 27 '11 at 23:52

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