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I want to do something like this but C# doesn't accept this:

    public static void setPrice(Double? value)
    {

        if (value != null) {
            this.TextBoxPrice.Text = Math.Round(value, 2).ToString();
        } else {
            this.TextBoxPrice.Text = "No Price";   
        }

    }

So does it mean using nullable type Double? is completely useless in this use case ? What can I use then ?

Update: I made a mystypo I actually meant

    public static void setPrice(Double? value)

so I corrected.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You're not currently using a nullable type - Double is a non-nullable value type, so can never be null. This is what you want:

public static void setPrice(Double? value)
{

    if (value != null) {
        this.TextBoxPrice.Text = Math.Round(value.Value, 2).ToString();
    } else {
        this.TextBoxPrice.Text = "No Price";   
    }
}

On the other hand, you should not be using a double to represent financial values. It's inappropriate as a binary floating point type. Use decimal (or decimal?) instead.

(Note that Double? is equivalent to Nullable<Double>.)

If you've come from a Java background, you may be expecting Double to be a reference "wrapper" type to start with - it's not. In C# double is simply an alias for System.Double; they're the same type.

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I made a mystypo I actually use Double? so my code is like yours and it doesn't work. –  user310291 Feb 27 '11 at 13:33
1  
@user you missed that Jon inserted a .Value when passing the double? to Math.Round. And that fixes your code, because it converts double? to double. And Math.Round expects double but not double?. –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 13:35
    
@CodeInChaos ah yes I missed this thanks :) –  user310291 Feb 27 '11 at 14:35

Jon's answer is fine -- pay particular attention to the bit about decimal -- but I thought I'd add that you can "lift" methods to nullable using higher-order programming. For example:

public static Func<T?, T?> Lift<T>(Func<T, T> func) where T : struct
{
    return (T? t)=>t.HasValue ? (T?)func(t.Value) : (T?)null;
}

public static Func<A?, R> LiftRef<A, R>(Func<A, R> func) where A : struct where R : class
{
    return (A? a)=>a.HasValue ? func(a.Value) : null;
}

And now you can say:

Func<decimal, decimal> round2 = x=>Math.Round(x, 2);
Func<decimal?, decimal?> liftedRound2 = Lift(round2);
Func<decimal?, string> liftedToString = LiftRef(decimal.ToString);
...

public static void SetPrice(decimal? value)
{
    this.TextBoxPrice.Text == liftedToString(liftedRound2(value)) ?? "No Price";
} 
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Thank you very much seems very interesting :) –  user310291 Feb 28 '11 at 16:32
1  
I may use this as an example of the most question marks in the shortest amount of code. –  Matthew Ferreira Feb 28 '11 at 20:42
    
Holy crap that just blew my mind... :-P –  Alxandr Mar 6 '11 at 20:09

I agree with Jon Skeet's answer and just wanted to add that in that specific case you might consider simply adding a ClearPrice method - for reasons of clearer API + avoiding the if-else.

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