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I have two dimensional array - and I need to convert it to one List ( same object )

I don't want to do it with 'for' or 'foreach' loop that will take each element and add it to the List.

Is there some other way to do it ?

Thanks

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1  
What is that list supposed to contain? –  BoltClock Feb 27 '11 at 9:28
3  
Is your 2D array rectangular(T[,]) or jagged(T[][])? –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 9:30
    
The list contain double. and the 2d array is T[,] –  Yanshof Feb 27 '11 at 9:35
1  
Why do you want to avoid loops? –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 9:41
2  
And do you want a short or a fast solution? –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 10:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To Convert double[, ] to List<double> ? If you are looking for a one-liner, here goes

double[,] d = new double[,]
{
    {1.0, 2.0},
    {11.0, 22.0},
    {111.0, 222.0},
    {1111.0, 2222.0},
    {11111.0, 22222.0}
};
List<double> lst = d.Cast<double>().ToList()


But, if you are looking for something efficient, I'd rather say you don't use this code.
Please follow either of the two answers mentioned below. Both are implementing much much better techniques.

share|improve this answer
1  
Aside from everything else, that will end up boxing every double in the array... it'll perform poorly. –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 9:48
1  
@Danny: I'm not really sure how this method is any clearer or easier to understand than a for loop, which the OP explicitly wishes to avoid. Not to mention the title says "Fast". –  Cody Gray Feb 27 '11 at 9:53
5  
In my quick benchmark of a 1000 x 1000 array, this performs over 30 times as slowly as the for loop or the Buffer.BlockCopy solution. I'm pretty surprised it's been accepted, given the "Fast" part of the title. –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 9:59
1  
@downvoters: thanks for letting me know that I know less than JonSkeet. :) Please understand that I am not deleting the answer, because OP used this code somewhere and is happy with it. Tell me, how many of you downvoters work at enterprise level? funny –  naveen Sep 5 '13 at 15:24
1  
@naveen: I see no real evidence of that, and given that the OP can use any of the answers by just copying and pasting them and adjusting to his variable names, they're all equally "fast" by that definition. Even if you think that's the most likely intention, your answer provides no indication of the inefficiency involved which would be appropriate in order to serve all readers rather than just the original poster. –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '13 at 19:09

Well, you can make it use a "blit" sort of copy, although it does mean making an extra copy :(

double[] tmp = new double[array.GetLength(0) * array.GetLength(1)];    
Buffer.BlockCopy(array, 0, tmp, 0, tmp.Length * sizeof(double));
List<double> list = new List<double>(tmp);

If you're happy with a single-dimensional array of course, just ignore the last line :)

Buffer.BlockCopy is implemented as a native method which I'd expect to use extremely efficient copying after validation. The List<T> constructor which accepts an IEnumerable<T> is optimized for the case where it implements IList<T>, as double[] does. It will create a backing array of the right size, and ask it to copy itself into that array. Hopefully that will use Buffer.BlockCopy or something similar too.

Here's a quick benchmark of the three approaches (for loop, Cast<double>().ToList(), and Buffer.BlockCopy):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        double[,] source = new double[1000, 1000];
        int iterations = 1000;

        Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            UsingCast(source);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("LINQ: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            UsingForLoop(source);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("For loop: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

        sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            UsingBlockCopy(source);
        }
        sw.Stop();
        Console.WriteLine("Block copy: {0}", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }


    static List<double> UsingCast(double[,] array)
    {
        return array.Cast<double>().ToList();
    }

    static List<double> UsingForLoop(double[,] array)
    {
        int width = array.GetLength(0);
        int height = array.GetLength(1);
        List<double> ret = new List<double>(width * height);
        for (int i = 0; i < width; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < height; j++)
            {
                ret.Add(array[i, j]);
            }
        }
        return ret;
    }

    static List<double> UsingBlockCopy(double[,] array)
    {
        double[] tmp = new double[array.GetLength(0) * array.GetLength(1)];    
        Buffer.BlockCopy(array, 0, tmp, 0, tmp.Length * sizeof(double));
        List<double> list = new List<double>(tmp);
        return list;
    }
}

Results (times in milliseconds);

LINQ: 253463
For loop: 9563
Block copy: 8697

EDIT: Having changed the for loop to call array.GetLength() on each iteration, the for loop and the block copy take around the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
The main problem with that one is that it can leave a big temporary array on the large object heap. –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 9:51
    
@CodeInChaos: Absolutely. It's a pain we can't tell List<T> to just use the given array :( I think it's still likely to be faster than looping though. –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 9:57
    
The problem with telling List<T> to use a certain array is that we could tell several lists to use the same array. Not sure how big a problem that's be in practice. –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 10:02
    
@CodeInChaos: Yup, that's why there's no way of doing it. It's probably the right decision on the part of the BCL team - it's just irritating for things like this :) –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 10:10
    
One interesting observation on the looping solution is that it's twice as slow if one swaps the inner and outer loop. Most likely due to CPU caches working better if you read/write sequentially. –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 11:05

A for loop is the fastest way.

You may be able to do it with LINQ, but that will be slower. And while you don't write a loop yourself, under the hood there is still a loop.

  • For a jagged array you can probably do something like arr.SelectMany(x=>x).ToList().
  • On T[,] you can simply do arr.ToList() since the IEnumerable<T> of T[,] returns all elements in the 2D array. Looks like the 2D array only implements IEnumerable but not IEnumerable<T> so you need to insert a Cast<double> like yetanothercoder suggested. That will make it even slower due to boxing.

The only thing that can make the code faster than the naive loop is calculating the number of elements and constructing the List with the correct capacity, so it doesn't need to grow.
If your array is rectangular you can obtain the size as width*height, with jagged arrays it can be harder.

int width=1000;
int height=3000;
double[,] arr=new double[width,height];
List<double> list=new List<double>(width*height);
int size1=arr.GetLength(1);
int size0=arr.GetLength(0);
for(int i=0;i<size0;i++)
{  
  for(int j=0;j<size1;j++)
    list.Add(arr[i,j]);
}

In theory it might be possible to use private reflection and unsafe code to make it a bit faster doing a raw memory copy. But I strongly advice against that.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you give a sample of what you're thinking about in the for loop so I can benchmark it against my Buffer.BlockCopy approach? I'd expect mine to be faster, but I want to make sure I'm testing the right thing... –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 9:47
    
I think should be arr.Cast<T>().ToList()? –  Danny Chen Feb 27 '11 at 9:49
    
Looks like yours if about twice as fast @Jon –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 9:57
    
@Danny That's why I edited it while you were writing your comment. –  CodesInChaos Feb 27 '11 at 9:58
    
@CodeInChaos: You can optimize yours somewhat by not calling GetLength on every iteration... but in my tests, Buffer.BlockCopy is still a bit faster. –  Jon Skeet Feb 27 '11 at 10:00

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