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I'm reading the great article series on Eric Lippert's blog about C#5's new asynchrony features. There he uses an example of a method fetchting documents from a remote location and, once retrieved, archives them on a storage drive. This is the code he uses:

async Task<long> ArchiveDocumentsAsync(List<Url> urls)
{
  long count = 0;
  Task archive = null;
  for(int i = 0; i < urls.Count; ++i)
  {
    var document = await FetchAsync(urls[i]);
    count += document.Length;
    if (archive != null)
      await archive;
    archive = ArchiveAsync(document);
  }
  return count;
}

Now imagine that fetching documents is very quick. So the first document is fetched. After that, it's started to be archived, while the second document is being fetched. Now imagine the second document has been fetched and the first document is still being archived. Will this piece of code start fetching the third document or wait until the first document has been archived?

As Eric says in its article, this code is converted by the compiler to this:

Task<long> ArchiveDocuments(List<Url> urls)
{
  var taskBuilder = AsyncMethodBuilder<long>.Create();
  State state = State.Start;
  TaskAwaiter<Document> fetchAwaiter = null;
  TaskAwaiter archiveAwaiter = null;
  int i;
  long count = 0;
  Task archive = null;
  Document document;
  Action archiveDocuments = () =>
  {
    switch(state)
    {
      case State.Start:        goto Start;
      case State.AfterFetch:   goto AfterFetch;
      case State.AfterArchive: goto AfterArchive;
    }
    Start:
    for(i = 0; i < urls.Count; ++i)
    {
      fetchAwaiter = FetchAsync(urls[i]).GetAwaiter();
      state = State.AfterFetch;
      if (fetchAwaiter.BeginAwait(archiveDocuments))
        return;
      AfterFetch:
      document = fetchAwaiter.EndAwait();
      count += document.Length;
      if (archive != null)
      {
        archiveAwaiter = archive.GetAwaiter();
        state = State.AfterArchive;
        //----> interesting part! <-----
        if (archiveAwaiter.BeginAwait(archiveDocuments))
          return; //Returns if archive is still working => Fetching of next document not done
        AfterArchive:
        archiveAwaiter.EndAwait();
      }
      archive = ArchiveAsync(document);
    }
    taskBuilder.SetResult(count);
    return;
  };
  archiveDocuments();
  return taskBuilder.Task;
} 

Additional question:

If the execution is stopped, would it be possible to continue with fetching documents? If yes, how?

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up vote 9 down vote accepted

Will this piece of code start fetching the third document or wait until the first document has been archived?

It waits. The point of the article is to describe how the control flow works with the transformation, not to actually describe the best possible system for managing the fetch-archive operation.

Suppose you did have a hundred documents to fetch and archive, and you really didn't care what order they happened in. (*) You could make a new asynchronous method "FetchAndArchive" that fetches one document asynchronously and then archives it asynchronously. You could then call that method a hundred times from another asynchronous method that makes a hundred tasks, each one of which asynchronously fetches a document and archives it. The result of that method is a combined task that represents the work of doing those hundred tasks, each of which represents the work of doing two tasks.

In this scenario, whenever one of the fetch operations can't produce its result immediately, one of the tasks that is ready to do its archive step can run.

I didn't want to get into task combinators in this article; I wanted to concentrate on a more simple control flow.


(*) You might care what order they happened in if instead of "download a document and archive it" the operation was "fetch the next video in this series and play it". You don't want to play them out-of-order even if they can more efficiently arrive out-of-order. Rather, you want to download the next one while the current one is playing.

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This piece of code makes it wait until the previous document is archived before starting to archive the next. And it will only start downloading the third once it started to archive the second.

if (archive != null)
      await archive;

But I think usually fetching is slow because it downloads from the internet, whereas archiving is fast since it's to a local hard-disk. But of course that depends or your exact use-case.

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Well, let's say you fetch documents from local drive and upload them to a remote location... – Simon Feb 27 '11 at 11:23

Without using async/await, the same* function in pseudo-code would be something like

  long ArchiveDocumentsAsync(List<Url> urls)
  {
    long count = 0;
    Task archive = null;

    for(int i = 0; i < urls.Count; ++i)
    {
      Task<Something> documentTask = FetchAsync(urls[i]);

      //Wait for the completion of the task.
      documentTask.Wait();

      //Get the results. 
      Something document = documentTask.getReturnValue();

      count += document.Length;

      if (archive != null) {
        //Wait for the completion of the task.
        archive.Wait(); 
      }

      archive = ArchiveAsync(document);
    }
    return count;
  }

Note that we never have two Fetches or two Archivings at the same time. The 2nd Archiving cannot start before the 1st Archiving is completed, and the 3rd Fetch cannot start before the 2nd Archiving is started.

(*) Now for the Async magic:

The compiler generates code so that the calls to Wait() do not actually block execution of the current thread. The function ArchiveDocumentsAsync simply "yields" to its caller (except if its caller is awaiting for its results - in this case the flow is yielded to the caller-caller, and so on).
The compiler generated machinery makes sure the execution continues right next were it had been stopped, after the Waited task is completed.

Note: Eric Lippert already answered this question. I just want to give my two cents and write down my understanding so you guys can warn here if it's wrong.

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