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here is the problem from spoj that states

For a string of n bits x1,x2,x3,...,Xn the adjacent bit count of the string (AdjBC(x)) is given by

X1*X2 + X2*X3 + X3*X4 + ... + Xn-1 * Xn

which counts the number of times a 1 bit is adjacent to another 1 bit. For example:

AdjBC(011101101) = 3
AdjBC(111101101) = 4
AdjBC(010101010) = 0

and the question is : Write a program which takes as input integers n and k and returns the number of bit strings x of n bits (out of 2ⁿ) that satisfy AdjBC(x) = k.

I have no idea how to solve this problem. Can you help me to solve this ?

Thanks

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Try anding the number with itself shifted one bit to the right, then count the resulting 1's in the outcome. ie. X & (X >> 1) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 27 '11 at 18:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Often in combinatorial problems, it helps to look at the set of values it produces. Using brute force I calculated the following table:

  k   0   1   2   3   4   5   6
n +----------------------------
1 |   2   0   0   0   0   0   0
2 |   3   1   0   0   0   0   0
3 |   5   2   1   0   0   0   0
4 |   8   5   2   1   0   0   0
5 |  13  10   6   2   1   0   0
6 |  21  20  13   7   2   1   0
7 |  34  38  29  16   8   2   1

The first column is the familiar Fibonacci sequence, and satisfies the recurrence relation f(n, 0) = f(n-1, 0) + f(n-2, 0)

The other columns satisfies the recurrence relation f(n, k) = f(n - 1, k) + f(n - 1, k - 1) + f(n - 2, k) - f(n - 2, k - 1)

With this, you can do some dynamic programming:

INPUT: n, k
row1 <- [2,0,0,0,...] (k+1 elements)
row2 <- [3,1,0,0,...] (k+1 elements)
repeat (n-2) times
  for j = k downto 1 do
    row1[j] <- row2[j] + row2[j-1] + row1[j] - row1[j-1]
  row1[0] <- row1[0] + row2[0]
  swap row1 and row2
return row2[k]
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As a hint you can split it up into two cases: numbers ending in 0 and numbers ending in 1.

def f(n, k):
    return f_ending_in_0(n, k) + f_ending_in_1(n, k)

def f_ending_in_0(n, k):
    if n == 1: return k == 0
    return f(n - 1, k)

def f_ending_in_1(n, k):
    if n == 1: return k == 0
    return f_ending_in_0(n - 1, k) + f_ending_in_1(n - 1, k - 1)

This gives the correct output but takes a long time to execute. You can apply standard dynamic programming or memoization techniques to get this to perform fast enough.

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