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in fact I have a mock object based on the interface. I would like to cast him into the real object..

    var BM = new Mock<DAL.INTERFACES.IMYCLASS>();

Is it possible to cast the mock to retrieve a MYCLASS object?

Thanks for responses..

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BM.Object should contain the IMYCLASS implementation created by Moq. –  J. Tihon Feb 27 '11 at 12:11
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using moq allows you to test your class, which relies on other classes/interfaces, without needing to instantiate them.

If you want an instance of an object which implements your interface, you can simply call Object on your member:

var BM = new Mock<DAL.INTERFACES.IMYCLASS>();
BM.Object;

Don't forget to setup the required methods your testclass relies on. Further information can be found on the QuickStart guide on the moq homepage.

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Object is actually a property, so it's BM.Object;, not BM.Object(); –  Igor Zevaka Mar 2 '11 at 12:00
    
@Igor Zevaka - thank you for the input. Corrected. –  froeschli Mar 2 '11 at 15:34
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No, that's not how most mocking libraries work.

What they do is create a whole new object, implementing the interface you ask for.

As such, the underlying object is not a MYCLASS object at all, it's something else altogether.

If you need to mock a concrete class, use a mocking library that can mock classes, and change your code to be (similar to):

var BM = new Mock<DAL.INTERFACES.MYCLASS>();
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Yes but methods have to be virtual and this is not the case so I think I have to change Classes I test for => private MYCLASS _foo; to Private IMYCLASS _foo; –  user399356 Feb 27 '11 at 12:23
    
Yeah, that sounds like a good idea :) –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 27 '11 at 12:47
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FYI, the mocking libraries subclass the target type behind the scenes.

So when you ask for Mock<IIenterface>(), you get an implementation of that interface, creates at rubtime like so:

//Your code

public interface IInterface {
 //methods
}

public class Implementation : IInterface{
  //methods
}

//At run time

public class IInterfaceImplementataionWithAReallyLongName354234234235423kjh23r54234 : IInterface {
 //methods
}

What you originally wanted to achieve is not actually possible because your implementation of IInterface is nowhere to be seen when Moq creates a proxy for you.

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