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I was trying to clean up some of the code on our website (in its current form, we would have to make 50 or so JS files and 50 or so PHP files for all of our offered products). I am looking at the code and it SHOULD be working, so I am confused as to where I screwed up. It doesn't seem like the Function is being called at all (I put an Alert at the top of it that never got called) so I assume I screwed up something in the first section.

                <select class="gameserverselecion4" name="slots">
                    <option value="10|457">10 Slots - 9.90 / mo</option>
                    <option value="12|458">12 Slots - 11.88 / mo</option>
                    <option value="14|459">14 Slots - 13.86 / mo</option>
                <option value="16|460">16 Slots - 15.84 / mo</option>
                    <option value="18|461">18 Slots - 17.82 / mo</option>
                    <option value="20|462">20 Slots - 19.80 / mo</option>
                    <option value="22|463">22 Slots - 21.78 / mo</option>
                    <option value="24|464">24 Slots - 23.76 / mo</option>
                    <option value="26|465">26 Slots - 25.74 / mo</option>
                    <option value="28|466">28 Slots - 27.72 / mo</option>
                    <option value="30|467">30 Slots - 29.70 / mo</option>
                    <option value="32468">32 Slots - 31.68 / mo</option>
            </select>
            </div>
            <div id="inputTopRight">
                <input type="button" name="submit" onclick="ProcessOrder('0','167','44');"/>
            </div>

Then the Javascript...

function ProcessOrder(loc,pid,cfopID)
{
    var values = document.dropTop.slots.value;
    var valuesArray = values.split("|");
    var slots = valuesArray[0];
    var cfopValue = valuesArray[1];
    alert("Slots is: " + slots " cfopValue is:" + cfopValue);

    switch (slots)
    {
        case 10:
        {
            window.location = "https://www.xfactorservers.com/clients/cart.php?a=add&pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue;
        }
        case 12:
        {
            window.location = "https://www.xfactorservers.com/clients/cart.php?a=add&pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue;
        }
share|improve this question
    
If you're using Firefox and have firebug installed, or any browser based on webkit, can you please post the console output when you click on your button ? as it is, it should work if the javascript is correctly included. –  krtek Feb 27 '11 at 12:15
    
I assume there's more to ProcessOrder than you're showing, because at the moment you haven't closed the function or the switch. –  Skilldrick Feb 27 '11 at 12:17
    
It is probably a syntax error somewhere else in your program. Try commenting out sections of the JavaScript code until the function runs, then you know the error is in the commented section. –  William Feb 27 '11 at 12:22

2 Answers 2

Your code has several issues.

Syntax errors

1. It's better to avoid putting braces on their own lines, or automatic semicolon insertion will get you at some time.

So instead of this:

function sayHello()
{
    alert('Hello, world!');
}

You should do this:

function sayHello() {
    alert('Hello, world!');
}

2. You shouldn't use braces around cases. Instead, end them with break statements.

Wrong:

switch (number) {
    case 4: {
        doSomething();
    }
    case 9: {
        doSomething();
    }
}

Correct:

switch (number) {
    case 4:
        doSomething();
        break;
    case 9:
        doSomething();
        break;
}

3. The switch statement and the function isn't closed.

4. This line has a syntax error.

alert("Slots is: " + slots " cfopValue is:" + cfopValue);
//                         ^---here

This is the correct syntax:

alert("Slots is: " + slots + " cfopvalue is:" + cfopvalue);

Styling issues

1. You can combine multiple var statements.

Instead of this:

var a = 'foo';
var b = 'bar';
var c = 'baz';

You can do this:

var a = 'foo',
    b = 'bar',
    c = 'baz';

2. You can combine multiple cases in switch statements.

switch (number) {
    case 3:
    case 12:
        doSomething();
        break;
}

3.

alert("Slots is: " + slots + " cfopvalue is:" + cfopvalue);

This will alert something like this:

Slots is: 10 cfopvalue is:20

You may want to insert a line break (\n), so it looks better:

alert("slots is: " + slots + "\ncfopvalue is: " + cfopvalue);

Slots is: 10 cfopvalue is: 20

4. Keep your content, styles and scripts separate. So instead of using inline event handlers, it's better to set up event handlers in your JS code, like this:

function addEvent(element, eventType, eventHandler) {
    if (window.addEventListener) {
        element.addEventListener(eventType, eventHandler, false);
    } else {
        element.attachEvent('on' + eventType, eventHandler);
    }
}

Example:

addEvent(document.getElementsByName('submit'), 'click', function() {
    ProcessOrder('0', '167', '44');
});

After you learn the most important things of vanilla JS1, you can use a library like jQuery [docs]. It will make things much simpler.

jQuery handles cross-browser incompatibilities for you, and uses CSS selectors to select elements. You could drop the previous event handler function, and do this:

$('[name=submit]').click(function() {
    ProcessOrder('0', '167', '44');
});

Keep in your mind that jQuery and other JavaScript libraries are built in vanilla, so it isn't “magic”.

1. vanilla JS (a.k.a pure JS): JavaScript without using libraries

share|improve this answer
    
"It's better to avoid putting braces on their own lines, or automatic semicolon insertion will get you at some time" This is not true of control structures (if, while, etc.). If fact, other than return with an object literal (a very edge case indeed), I can't think of any other example. Are there any others? –  T.J. Crowder Feb 27 '11 at 12:41
    
@T.J. Crowder Mixing various styles isn't a good practice. So if you'll ever have a return statement with an object literal, you'll have to move all of your braces. –  nyuszika7h Feb 27 '11 at 12:44
    
The braces in question serve completely different purposes (control block vs. object definition), it's perfectly reasonable to have different rules for those. Again: Do you have any other other examples? –  T.J. Crowder Feb 27 '11 at 12:46
    
@T.J. Crowder Currently, I can't think of any other examples; but I don't want to debate, so I kindly request you to stop it. Thanks. –  nyuszika7h Feb 27 '11 at 12:54
1  
I wasn't debating, I was asking. It's fine if you can't think of a second one, no worries. Best, –  T.J. Crowder Feb 27 '11 at 13:06

This line has a syntax error:

alert("Slots is: " + slots " cfopValue is:" + cfopValue);
//                         ^-- here

...which is probably why you're not seeing the alert. If you fix it, you may find that the function gets called (since the syntax error above prevents it getting defined).

Once you get it to the point the function is called, you still have an (unrelated) problem: You have the syntax of your switch statement wrong, although in fairly harmless way provided you really do want all of the conditions to fall through into each other. Individual cases are not enclosed in braces, those braces you have there are completely ignored by the parser. You terminate a case with break, so:

switch (slots)
{
    case 10:
        window.location = "https://www.xfactorservers.com/clients/cart.php?a=add&pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue;
        break;

    case 12:
        window.location = "https://www.xfactorservers.com/clients/cart.php?a=add&pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue;
        break;

    default:
        // do whatever you do if nothing matches (this is optional)
        break;
}

Without the breaks, the code for each case will flow into the next. So for instance, in your original, if slots were 10, first you'd set the window location to the one in the 10 case, then execution would continue with the 12 case and set it to a different location, etc., etc.


Off-topic: You can factor out a lot of commonality in that function; example:

function ProcessOrder(loc,pid,cfopID)
{
    var values = document.dropTop.slots.value;
    var valuesArray = values.split("|");
    var slots = valuesArray[0];
    var cfopValue = valuesArray[1];
    var destinationMap = {
            "10": "pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue,
            "12": "pid=" + pid + "&configoption[" + cfopID + "]=" + cfopValue,
            "14": "pid=167&configoption[44]=459",
            "16": "pid=167&configoption[44]=460",
            "18": "pid=167&configoption[44]=461",
            "20": "pid=167&configoption[44]=462",
            "22": "pid=167&configoption[44]=463",
            "24": "pid=167&configoption[44]=464",
            "26": "pid=167&configoption[44]=465",
            "28": "pid=167&configoption[44]=466",
            "30": "pid=167&configoption[44]=467",
            "32": "pid=167&configoption[44]=468"
        };
    var dest = destinationMap[slots];
    if (dest) {
        window.location = "https://www.xfactorservers.com/clients/cart.php?a=add&" + dest;
    }
    else {
        // Do whatever you should do if `slots` isn't a value you recognize
    }
}

(I left the pid= in each string because it seemed to me it helped with context.)

share|improve this answer
    
Here is the full contents of my js file pastebin.com/1V5aActC –  Michael Pfiffer Feb 27 '11 at 12:18
    
@Michael: Actually debugging it will require the full page, and is probably something best left to you. But note the edit I was adding as you commented, your switch statement is incorrect (in a way I wouldn't expect the parser to care about; it won't work correctly, though, once you get it to the point it gets called). –  T.J. Crowder Feb 27 '11 at 12:22
    
@Michael: But at a minimum, your alert line is a syntax error. You're missing a +. (Any half-decent browser should have flagged that up for you.) That's probably why you're not seeing the alert. I've updated my answer to flag that up. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 27 '11 at 12:24
    
+1 For the refactored version :) –  Ivo Wetzel Feb 27 '11 at 12:40

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