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I found some code that had "optimization" like this:

void somefunc(SomeStruct param){
    float x = param.x; // param.x and x are both floats. supposedly this makes it faster access
    float y = param.y;
    float z = param.z;
}

And the comments said that it will make the variable access faster, but i've always thought structs element access is as fast as if it wasnt struct after all.

Could someone clear my head off this?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The usual rules for optimization (Michael A. Jackson) apply: 1. Don't do it. 2. (For experts only:) Don't do it yet.

That being said, let's assume it's the innermost loop that takes 80% of the time of a performance-critical application. Even then, I doubt you will ever see any difference. Let's use this piece of code for instance:

struct Xyz {
    float x, y, z;
};

float f(Xyz param){
    return param.x + param.y + param.z;
}

float g(Xyz param){
    float x = param.x;
    float y = param.y;
    float z = param.z;
    return x + y + z;
}

Running it through LLVM shows: Only with no optimizations, the two act as expected (g copies the struct members into locals, then proceeds sums those; f sums the values fetched from param directly). With standard optimization levels, both result in identical code (extracting the values once, then summing them).

For short code, this "optimization" is actually harmful, as it copies the floats needlessly. For longer code using the members in several places, it might help a teensy bit if you actively tell your compiler to be stupid. A quick test with 65 (instead of 2) additions of the members/locals confirms this: With no optimizations, f repeatedly loads the struct members while g reuses the already extracted locals. The optimized versions are again identical and both extract the members only once. (Surprisingly, there's no strength reduction turning the additions into multiplications even with LTO enabled, but that just indicates the LLVM version used isn't optimizing too agressively anyway - so it should work just as well in other compilers.)

So, the bottom line is: Unless you know your code will have to be compiled by a compiler that's so outragously stupid and/or ancient that it won't optimize anything, you now have proof that the compiler will make both ways equivalent and can thus do away with this crime against readability and brewity commited in the name of performance. (Repeat the experiment for your particular compiler if necessary.)

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2  
"With no optimizations" - I'd stress that it's not really legitimate to worry about the performance of code compiled with no optimizations, unless you have in mind to target some specific creaking old non-optimizing compiler. Anyone can write a poor C compiler (C++ harder to actually write, but same principle). There's no point contorting your code to deal with compilers that are bad in a particular way unless that way is (a) either reasonably common, or else reasonably likely to hit you for specific reasons; and (b) will noticeably damage performance. I agree with you that's not a risk here. –  Steve Jessop Feb 27 '11 at 14:48

Rule of thumb: it's not slow, unless profiler says it is. Let the compiler worry about micro-optimisations (they're pretty smart about them; after all, they've been doing it for years) and focus on the bigger picture.

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1  
i know, these things just bother my head :) –  Rookie Feb 27 '11 at 14:31
4  
@Rookie: there is lots of confusion lying around concerning micro-optimizations. In general, avoid premature optimization, use the right data structures and algorithms, and then optimize based on measurements if you encounter a performance bottleneck. –  Philipp Feb 27 '11 at 14:41

I'm no compiler guru, so take this with a grain of salt. I'm guessing that the original author of the code is assuming that by copying the values from the struct into local variables, the compiler has "placed" those variables into floating point registers which are available on some platforms (e.g., x86). If there aren't enough registers to go around, they'd be put in the stack.

That being said, unless this code was in the middle of an intensive computation/loop, I'd strive for clarity rather than speed. It's pretty rare that anyone is going to notice a few instructions difference in timing.

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2  
On the other hand, I suppose that if param.x & co. are used extensively in the function the compiler will find by itself a "fast" location where to store such values (probably an FPU register). As you said, I wouldn't worry about it. –  Matteo Italia Feb 27 '11 at 14:28
1  
@Matteo: Indeed. As Piotr said, only optimize if you can prove that this is really a bottleneck. It might be the case that the compiler is dumb enough to not recognize that it can store the three values in registers, but it's impossible to tell without actually looking at the assembly. I sometimes write such code, but only because using the values then requires less writing. –  Philipp Feb 27 '11 at 14:34
    
@Philipp: and you could reduce the writing without even copying the values if you wanted - float &x = param.x; etc. Then have another round of micro-optimization speculation/argument whether a reference variable is better, worse, or exactly the same as a float variable :-) –  Steve Jessop Feb 27 '11 at 14:52
    
@Steve: I'd clearly say it is much, much worse. If the compiler cannot prove that there is no aliasing, then it would have to place the numbers on the stack and use indirection each time a number is accessed; this could lead to performance that is worse by orders of magnitude. In general, one should use references to built-in types only if they reference some object that has to be modified. In all other cases, copying is faster, easier to understand, and less to write. –  Philipp Feb 27 '11 at 14:59
    
@Philipp: The emitted code taking a reference like that could be exactly the same as writing out the member access every time, although of course it's always possible the compiler will miss a trick. Aliases that are all local to the function ought to be no harder to optimize than with no aliasing at all. So if performance with a float variable is much, much better than a reference, does that mean it's also much, much better than accessing the member? –  Steve Jessop Feb 27 '11 at 18:25

You'd have to look at the compiled code on a particular implementation to be sure, but there's no reason in principle why your preferred code (using the struct members) should necessarily be any slower than the code you've shown (copying into variables and then using the variables).

someFunc takes a struct by value, so it has its own local copy of that struct. The compiler is perfectly at liberty to apply exactly the same optimizations to the struct members, as it would apply to the float variables. They're both automatic variables, and in both cases the "as-if" rule allows them to be stored in register(s) rather than in memory provided that the function produces the correct observable behavior.

This is unless of course you take a pointer to the struct and use it, in which case the values need to be written in memory somewhere, in the correct order, pointed to by the pointer. This starts to limit optimization, and other limits are introduced by the fact that if you pass around a pointer to an automatic variable, the compiler can no longer assume that the variable name is the only reference to that memory and hence the only way its contents can be modified. Having multiple references to the same object is called "aliasing", and does sometimes block optimizations that could be made if the object was somehow known not to be aliased.

Then again, if this is an issue, and the rest of the code in the function somehow does use a pointer to the struct, then of course you could be on dodgy ground copying the values into variables from the POV of correctness. So the claimed optimization is not quite so straightforward as it looks in that case.

Now, there may be particular compilers (or particular optimization levels) which fail to apply to structs all the optimizations that they're permitted to apply, but do apply equivalent optimizations to float variables. If so then the comment would be right, and that's why you have to check to be sure. For example, maybe compare the emitted code for this:

float somefunc(SomeStruct param){
    float x = param.x; // param.x and x are both floats. supposedly this makes it faster access
    float y = param.y;
    float z = param.z;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        x += (y +i) * z;
    }
    return x;
}

with this:

float somefunc(SomeStruct param){
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
        param.x += (param.y +i) * param.z;
    }
    return param.x;
}

There may also be optimization levels where the extra variables make the code worse. I'm not sure I put much trust in code comments that say "supposedly this makes it faster access", sounds like the author doesn't really have a clear idea why it matters. "Apparently it makes it faster access - I don't know why but the tests to confirm this and to demonstrate that it makes a noticeable difference in the context of our program, are in source control in the following location" is a lot more like it ;-)

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interesting... I was going to comment that the two are not equivalent, that in the 2nd instance param.x gets modified -- but then realized you're passing in SomeStruct param by value, so the caller's instance of the input argument would not be modified. –  Jason S Feb 27 '11 at 14:48
    
@Jason: exactly, and if the param is passed by reference or by pointer, then as well of the issue of writing back the result to the struct, aliasing concerns probably come in. They might not, for example if someFunc calls no other functions and contains no memory barriers then there's no other code that gets a chance to run and modify the value (in the case of threading, that's "modify the value from the POV of someFunc"), so the optimization might still be on. –  Steve Jessop Feb 27 '11 at 14:59

There are good and valid reasons to do that kind of optimization when pointers are used, because consuming all inputs first frees the compiler from possible aliasing issues which prevent it from producing optimal code (there's restrict nowadays too, though).

For non-pointer types, there is in theory an overhead because every member is accessed via the struct's this pointer. This may in theory be noticeable within an inner loop and will in theory be a diminuitive overhead otherwise.
In practice, however, a modern compiler will almost always (unless there is a complex inheritance hierarchy) produce the exact same binary code.

I had asked myself the exact same question as you did about two years ago and did a very extensive test case using gcc 4.4. My findings were that unless you really try to throw sticks between the compiler's legs on purpose, there is absolutely no difference in the generated code.

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I have just modified the examples in my answer to accept a pointer to SomeStruct instead of a value, and the result is still identical for both examples when using -O2. –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 27 '11 at 16:02
    
Pointer to SomeStruct will likely still produce the same code if it is the only argument, true. What I was referring to was pointer aliasing. When the compiler cannot be sure that no other pointer could possibly have modified a value, it has to reload values. That would be the case if you had two or more pointers and were writing to at least one before having read all values that will be used in the calculation. Refer to the "Demystifying The Restrict Keyword" article for more info. –  Damon Feb 27 '11 at 18:01

In an unoptimised code:

  • function parameters (which are not passed by reference) are on the stack
  • local variables are also on the stack

Unoptimised access to local variables and function parameters in an assembly language look more-or-less like this:

mov %eax, %ebp+ compile-time-constant

where %ebp is a frame pointer (sort of 'this' pointer for a function).

It makes no difference if you access a parameter or a local variable.

The fact that you are accessing an element from a struct makes absolutely no difference from the assembly/machine point of view. Structs are constructs made in C to make programmer's life easier.

So, ulitmately, my answer is: No, there is absolutely no benefit in doing that.

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Compiler may make faster code to copy float-to-float. But when x will used it will be converted to internal FPU representation.

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When you specify a "simple" variable (not a struct/class) to be operated upon, the system only has to go to that place and fetch the data it wants.

But when you refer to a variable inside a struct or class, like A.B, the system needs to calculate where B is inside that area called A (because there may be other variables declared before it), and that calculation takes a bit more than the the more plain access described above.

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1  
Surely this overhead would occur at compile time rather than run time, right? –  Cody Gray Feb 27 '11 at 14:36
    
Actually you're right. I was thinking more of pointer to a struct. –  Assaf Levy Feb 27 '11 at 14:47

The real answer is given by Piotr. This one is just for fun.

I have tested it. This code:

float somefunc(SomeStruct param, float &sum){
    float x = param.x;
    float y = param.y;
    float z = param.z;
    float xyz = x * y * z;
    sum = x + y + z;
    return xyz;
}

And this code:

float somefunc(SomeStruct param, float &sum){
    float xyz = param.x * param.y * param.z;
    sum = param.x + param.y + param.z;
    return xyz;
}

Generate identical assembly code when compiled with g++ -O2. They do generate different code with optimization turned off, though. Here is the difference:

<   movl    -32(%rbp), %eax
<   movl    %eax, -4(%rbp)
<   movl    -28(%rbp), %eax
<   movl    %eax, -8(%rbp)
<   movl    -24(%rbp), %eax
<   movl    %eax, -12(%rbp)
<   movss   -4(%rbp), %xmm0
<   mulss   -8(%rbp), %xmm0
<   mulss   -12(%rbp), %xmm0
<   movss   %xmm0, -16(%rbp)
<   movss   -4(%rbp), %xmm0
<   addss   -8(%rbp), %xmm0
<   addss   -12(%rbp), %xmm0
---
>   movss   -32(%rbp), %xmm1
>   movss   -28(%rbp), %xmm0
>   mulss   %xmm1, %xmm0
>   movss   -24(%rbp), %xmm1
>   mulss   %xmm1, %xmm0
>   movss   %xmm0, -4(%rbp)
>   movss   -32(%rbp), %xmm1
>   movss   -28(%rbp), %xmm0
>   addss   %xmm1, %xmm0
>   movss   -24(%rbp), %xmm1
>   addss   %xmm1, %xmm0

The lines marked < correspond to the version with "optimization" variables. It seems to me that the "optimized" version is even slower than the one with no extra variables. This is to be expected, though, as x, y and z are allocated on the stack, exactly like the param. What's the point of allocating more stack variables to duplicate existing ones?

If the one who did that "optimization" knew the language better, he would probably have declared those variables as register, but even that leaves the "optimized" version slightly slower and longer, at least on G++/x86-64.

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register is more or less ignored (except where the standard mandates semantical differences). But of course you are right: this "optimization" is snake oil. –  Philipp Feb 27 '11 at 19:50
    
@Philipp, I have actually tried it with register. It isn't ignored, and it makes the "optimized" version a bit faster, but it still remains slower than the other one. –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 28 '11 at 16:19

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