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5 framework, not using relationship foreign key in database, and i wonder how 4.0 can improve this junk of code which i need to pass back the multiple object after multiple joins of tables.

  public IList<User> GetTutorByCourseId(int courseId)
    {
        IList<User> output = new List<User>();
        using (leDataContext db = new leDataContext())
        {
            try
            {
                var m = from c in db.Courses
                        join ct in db.CourseByTutors on c.Id equals ct.CourseId
                        join u in db.Users on ct.TutorId equals u.Id
                        where c.Id == courseId
                        select new
                        {
                            c, ct, u
                        };

                foreach (var result in m)
                {
                    User user = new User();
                    user.Id = result.u.Id;
                    user.Name = result.u.Name;
                    user.CourseTutor.Id = result.ct.Id;
                    user.Course.Name = result.c.Name;    
                    output.Add(user);
                }
                return output;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Logger.Error(typeof(User), ex.ToString());
                throw;
            }
        }
    }

There are 3 objects being return to the caller in GUI. However, to do this i got to add the property of public CourseByTutors{get;set} and the public Course(get;set;) in the User class which i find that it will mess up my code. In this case, how would 4.0 able to solve this? i read something about select tupel .. ??

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You can select a tuple, or at least dynamic type in 3.5, AFAIK. –  Grant Thomas Feb 27 '11 at 15:02
    
Could you show me an example by converting my code above? i am actually deciding whether to convert to 4.0 or not.. –  belinq Feb 27 '11 at 15:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even though you don't have foreign keys in the database, there's no reason that you can't add relationships into your EF model. This will help simplify the problem as you will not have to generate additional properties to store your child values; CourseTutor, CourseName etc..

Both 3.5 and 4.0 can help out here, although, in my experience this is much easier in 4.0.

Once the your code above might look something like:

var results = (from u in db.Users
        where u.Course.Id == courseId
        select u).ToList();
return results;

Hope this helps.

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I think keeping the relationships in the model is the right thing to do, but this won't really solve the problem. When you do this you do get all the users in the course, but for each user you get all of their courses and all of the courses they tutor. Ignoring that there probably isn't a direct course relationship (it's through one of tutor, instructor, or student), for each user you will get the collection of courses they tutor, not just the one course in question. Figuring out which course is of interest from this may not be possible. Better to use a specific model for the view, IMO. –  tvanfosson Feb 27 '11 at 15:23
    
If you are simply returning the data as a read only view, then why not consider using a stored procedure to flatten the query and return all the data to you in one simple query? It all depends where your experience is and what technology you are happy working with. If you do decide on using stored procedures then you have a few options; use the entity framework (4.0 is much easier) check out msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896279.aspx or create a dataset and add the stored procedure to it. The latter is a breeze to do but perhaps will introduce something else to maintain. –  dubs Feb 27 '11 at 19:14

What about this (in 3.5)?

select new User
{
    Id = u.Id,
    Name = u.Name,
    CourseTutor = new CourseTutor {Id = ct.Id},
    Course = new Course {Name = c.Name}
};
return m.ToList();

EDIT: Replaced illegal CourseTutor.Name and Course.Id initializers. The corrected code will work, assuming that the constructor of User didn't do any fancy initialization of CourseTutor and Course.

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1  
+1. Incidentally ReSharper will provide some refactoring hints towards similar solutions. –  TrueWill Feb 27 '11 at 15:09
    
thanks for the prompt reply. But i don think u are able to pass in that way since i am passing back the IList<User>? i got this error 'Invalid initializer member declarator' at the CourseTutor.Id = ct.Id –  belinq Feb 27 '11 at 15:10
2  
@belinq: It should work. A from ... select statement returns an IQueryable<Type>, where Type is the type of whatever you write after select. So my suggestion will first produce an IQueryable<User>, on which we call ToList() to get a List<User>, which implements IList<User> and can therefore be returned. –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 27 '11 at 15:13
1  
@belinq: You should use select new ExistingClass{} when you have an existing class that "fits" the query result, and when you want to return a query result from a method. If you only want to use the query result internally in a method and you don't have a class that "fits" the result, you can use select new{} (it's called an anonymous type). –  Aasmund Eldhuset Feb 27 '11 at 15:22
2  
@belinq -- it's not junk because it's long, it's junk because you're corrupting your entity model by creating dependencies merely to support your display needs. You intuitively recognize that your display and entity models are different -- thus your frustration -- but you need to take the next step of formalizing this by creating separate models for your display needs. –  tvanfosson Feb 27 '11 at 15:36

The way that I would normally handle this is to have a separate model from my data entities for the GUI that includes just the information that the GUI needs. You could do this in 3.5 if you want.

public class TutorViewModel
{
     public IEnumerable<User> Tutors { get; set; }
     // the pair CourseId, UserId is the relation in CourseTutors so we only
     // need to keep it once, not once per user.
     public int CourseId { get; set; } 
     public string CourseName { get; set; }
}



public TutorViewModel GetTutorByCourseId(int courseId)
{
    var model = new TutorViewModel { CourseId = courseId };

    using (leDataContext db = new leDataContext())
    {
        try
        {
            model.CourseName = db.Courses
                                 .First( c => c.CourseId == courseId )
                                 .Name;
            model.Users = db.CourseByTutors
                            .Where( c => c.Id == courseId )
                            .Join( db.Users,
                                   c => c.TutorId,
                                   u => u.Id,
                                   (c,u) => u );

            return model;
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Logger.Error(typeof(User), ex.ToString());
            throw;
        }
    }
}
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