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I am trying to make a c program where i am using mknod command like

#include<stdio.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#include<string.h>

char info[50];

main() {
    int fdr;
    int rc = mknod("testfile",'b',0);
    if(rc<0) {
        perror("Error in mnod");
    }
    fdr=open("testfile",O_RDONLY);
    read(fdr,info,50);
    printf("\n Received message=%s",info);
    printf("\n");
} 

And do some stuff. It works well on Red Hat system, but fails on ubuntu giving error invalid argument.

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The code you posted does not compile. Please copy and paste the actual code you are using. –  bdonlan Feb 27 '11 at 15:57
    
#include<stdio.h> #include<fcntl.h> #include<string.h> char info[50]; main() { int fdr; int rc = mknod("testfile",'b',0); if(rc<0) { perror("Error in mnod"); } fdr=open("testfile",O_RDONLY); read(fdr,info,50); printf("\n Received message=%s",info); printf("\n"); } –  asb Feb 27 '11 at 15:58
1  
You should probably edit this into your question, it's hard to read when it's squashed in a single line like that... –  bdonlan Feb 27 '11 at 15:59

2 Answers 2

mknod is deprecated; you should not be using it. If you want to create a FIFO, use the standard mkfifo. If you want to create an ordinary file, use creat or open with O_CREAT. Yes mknod can create device nodes, and on some systems might still be the way to do it, but on a modern Linux system you rely on the kernel and/or udevd to handle this.

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1  
hmm mkfifo("testfile",010666) ==> Fails saying Invalid Argument –  asb Feb 27 '11 at 16:52
2  
010666 is not a valid mode. The mode is 0666. –  R.. Feb 28 '11 at 4:26

mknod("testfile",'b',0);

'b' is not a very sensible argument for mknod here. mknod's argument should be a bitwise OR of a permissions mask (modified by umask) and S_IFREG (for a regular file) or S_IFIFO (for a FIFO). For example:

mknod("textfile", S_IFREG | 0666, 0);

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I tired this too but still the same error –  asb Feb 27 '11 at 16:04
    
mknod("testfile",010666,0); this one works for the linux [ red hat ] but for ubuntu give same error. –  asb Feb 27 '11 at 16:05
    
Are you using 010666, or S_IFIFO | 0666? Because the latter works for me... –  bdonlan Feb 27 '11 at 16:09
    
@asb, also, what filesystem are you attempting this on? –  bdonlan Feb 27 '11 at 16:10
    
tried with the both option .... filesystem is ext4 –  asb Feb 27 '11 at 16:10

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