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I am attempting to create something like this:

class food
{
public:
   void EAT(); //Whatever happens...
   int bitesLeft //This is decreased by one each time you eat the food
};

class cheese: public food
{
public:
   void EAT(); //Some overloaded form of the "eat" command... 
};

Is there a way to create one of each at runtime, and have a function that can take either one as arguments without screwing up the bitesLeft variable of each one?

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2  
The EAT method in the parent class isn't overloaded, that refers to functions with the same name but different arguments. You're thinking of overriding, which occurs when a derived class implements a function of the same name and arguments as in a parent class. But in this case it's not being overridden either, since the one in the parent class isn't marked virtual. What's happening is that the definition in the derived class is hiding the one in the parent class. –  Tim Martin Feb 27 '11 at 17:19
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, there is:

void myfunc(food* f)
{
    f->EAT();
}

int main()
{
    food f;
    cheese c;
    myfunc(&f);
    myfunc(&c);
    return 0;
}

However, for this to work, you need to declare EAT() as virtual in the food class, as in virtual void EAT();. Also, you probably want to declare bitesLeft as protected, so that only the class itself as well as the subclasses can access it.

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Thanks! that took care of my problem! –  IamCPlusPlus Feb 27 '11 at 21:15
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I'm assuming you want something like:

function doStuff(food * f) {
    f->EAT();
}

And you want this to call the specialised EAT if a cheese is passed in, or the non-specialised form if a food is passed in. In this case, you need a virtual function:

class food {
  public:
    virtual void EAT();
    virtual ~food(); // Any class being used polymorphically should have
                     // a virtual destructor
}

class cheese : public food {
  public:
    virtual void EAT();
}

I'm not exactly sure what you mean by 'without screwing up the bytesLeft variable. This is a public data member, so it's possible for any code to modify the value of the variable in ways you weren't expecting. This includes code in the cheese class, but also code that's not in either of the classes.

If you want to prevent code in the cheese.EAT method from modifying the bitesLeft member then you should declare it as private in the base class.

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also add virtual destructor to food. –  UmmaGumma Feb 27 '11 at 17:30
    
Good point. I wasn't intending this to be a fully working example, but I'll add the virtual destructor in because not having one would be a bug. –  Tim Martin Feb 27 '11 at 17:33
    
+1 After adding virtual destructor :). –  UmmaGumma Feb 27 '11 at 17:37
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The member variables of two objects are separate. This code works as you expect:

void AFunction( food& x ) {
  x.EAT();
}

food a;
a.bitesLeft = 10;
cheese b;
b.bitesLeft = 5;

AFunction(a);   // a.bitesLeft --> 9
AFunction(b);   // b.bitesLeft --> 4
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This will copy the food object, and then call EAT() on the copy, which will not modify the original object, as your comment seems to indicate, right? –  JaredC Feb 27 '11 at 17:32
    
@JaredC, You are right. I have added the & operator at the argument. It should be correct now. –  linepogl Feb 27 '11 at 17:38
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