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Simple question...

How do I convert a char to an NSString in "Objective C"?

Not a c-string, just a simple char c = 'a'.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You can use stringWithFormat:, passing in a format of %c to represent a character, like this:

char c = 'a';
NSString *s = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%c", c];
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Awesome, thanks BoltClock. I'm new to Objective-C and alot of this stuff is a bit undiscoverable to me at the moment. Thanks! :-) –  Senkwe Feb 27 '11 at 17:41
    
@Hovito: If you use Xcode, remember there's always the built-in documentation viewer :) –  BoltClock Feb 27 '11 at 17:43
1  
stringWithFormat is an overkill, IMHO. –  Seva Alekseyev Feb 27 '11 at 17:43
    
@Seva: Yeah I agree, I'm guessing it's because of the extra NSString containing the format. I upvoted your answer :) –  BoltClock Feb 27 '11 at 17:44

You can make a C-string out of one character like this:

char cs[2] = {c, 0}; //c is the character to convert
NSString *s = [[NSString alloc] initWithCString:cs encoding: SomeEncoding];

Alternatively, if the character is known to be an ASCII character (i. e. Latin letter, number, or a punctuation sign), here's another way:

unichar uc = (unichar)c; //Just extend to 16 bits
NSString *s = [NSString stringWithCharacters:&uc length:1];

The latter snippet with surely fail (not crash, but produce a wrong string) with national characters. For those, simple extension to 16 bits is not a correct conversion to Unicode. That's why the encoding parameter is needed.

Also note that the two snippets above produce a string with diferent deallocation requirements. The latter makes an autoreleased string, the former makes a string that needs a [release] call.

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