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what is the very least date and time I can have for my time element to be machine readable. An example would help very much.

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1 Answer 1

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The spec says this:

The time element represents either a time on a 24 hour clock, or a precise date in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, optionally with a time and a time-zone offset.

You may ask, "what is the 'proleptic Gregorian calendar'?". I sure did.

According to Wikipedia:

The proleptic Gregorian calendar is produced by extending the Gregorian calendar backward to dates preceding its official introduction in 1582.

Another informative paragraph from the spec:

The time element is not intended for encoding times for which a precise date or time cannot be established. For example, it would be inappropriate for encoding times like "one millisecond after the big bang", "the early part of the Jurassic period", or "a winter around 250 BCE".

For dates before the introduction of the Gregorian calendar, authors are encouraged to not use the time element, or else to be very careful about converting dates and times from the period to the Gregorian calendar. This is complicated by the manner in which the Gregorian calendar was phased in, which occurred at different times in different countries, ranging from partway through the 16th century all the way to early in the 20th.

So, it looks like the answer is: don't use it for dates before the introduction of the Gregorian calendar, or else be careful about it.

You asked:

what is the very least date and time I can have for my time element to be machine readable.

It depends on what machine is reading it.

For example, a lot of software won't handle dates before Unix time (January 1, 1970).

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