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I am using Ruby on Rails 3 and I would like to send 'email' and 'password' values (I know, I should not, but I need that) over the HTTP protocoll. I need to send user credentials from a my client application to a my service application*.

I can use a public a private RSA key to accomplish that but, if so, I must don't send the public key to the recipient over HTTP, otherwise an hacker can steal the key and decrypt contents. On other hands, the HMAC encryption (if I understood that) is good only to verify the data integrity and the authenticity of a message.

I heard of AES... is it good for my purposes? If so, where I can find a tutorial on how to use that with Ruby\Ruby on Rails? I "simply" need to encrypt user credentials on the client side and decrypt that on the server side.

P.S. I: If I'm wrong about something I wrote, let me know.

P.S. II: If you suggest other methods, let me know!


UPDATE I

*The client is a web application (a site web, for example 'www.site1.com), the server is another web application (another site web, for example 'www.site2.com).


UPDATE II

Using RSA encryption...

Client-I-service steps:

  1. Client generates public\private key paris

  2. I (a real person) copy-paste manually the public key from the client to the service

  3. Client sends to the service the message including encrypted user credential (client doesn't send\append the public key to the HTTP request)

  4. Service, using the public key (that only the service knows), decrypts user credentials and proceed to the login of the user

Now, if I send the public key instead of doing the step 2, and so the client must send the public key in step 3 over the HTTP protocoll, an hacker can

  1. intercept the message

  2. take the public key

  3. decrypt the user credentials and steal those

So, should I encrypt user credential (those are important and private information) using a RSA encryption if I send the public key to the service?

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1  
Is HTTPS out of the question? It's designed to solve the problem of encrypting HTTP transfers. –  peejaybee Feb 28 '11 at 1:13
    
@user502052 Any encryption mechanism will need both sides to know the key(s). With public-key cryptography, one side knows the "public key" and the other knows the "private key". –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:18
    
@user502052 If you can use HTTPS, then go ahead and use it. Use a form with method=post to transmit the data; there's nothing else you need to do. –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:19
    
@tiagoinu I know. In my case I need something that is known only by the client and the server... but what encryption procedure I must use? This is the problem. –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:20
    
@user502052 Any procedure you want. Just do not send any key over HTTP. Save it somewhere on the server and on the client. –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:24
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can use a public a private RSA key to accomplish that but, if so, I must don't send the public key to the recipient over HTTP, otherwise an hacker can steal the key and decrypt contents.

1) Send the public key to the recipient over HTTP.
2) The client uses it to encrypt the data.
3) No hacker can decrypt the contents with the public key.
4) In your server, use the private key do decrypt the contents.

Example: Encrypting Sensitive Data with Ruby (on Rails)

"In an asymmetric key encryption scheme, anyone can encrypt messages using the public key, but only the holder of the paired private key can decrypt."

EDIT

Background:

  • The public key is used to and only to encrypt data.
  • The private key is used to and only to decrypt data.

If a hacker intercepts the public key, the only thing she can do is encrypt data.
Even HTTPS works this way.

Obs: Only the server should know the private key.

Obs2: By all means, try to enable HTTPS. It will make your life far easier.

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It is a (very) good idea, but is there some more "standard" way (as HMAC, AES, ... that is, an encryption name procedure to encrypt data!) to accomplish what I need? –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:34
    
@user502052 The "client" is the user internet browser or you have something installed on the client-side? –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:39
    
@tiagoinu No, the client is a web application (a site web, for example 'www.site1.com), the server is another web application (another site web, for example 'www.site2.com). I need to transmit user credentials from the client to the server. –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:42
    
@user502052 I found an example: stuff-things.net/2007/06/11/… –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:45
    
@tiagoinu I had already read that article, but it uses the RSA encryption procedure. It isn't what I would like to use for reasons I explained in the question. I'm beginning to think that I have to use RSA without sending the public key, but making a copy-paste of that from the client to service side. –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:49
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HTTPS with TLS/SSL.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Https

This is a solved problem.

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As I said in an previous comment, I can not use that. –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:18
    
@user502052 Actually you said you could use HTTPS. –  tiago2014 Feb 28 '11 at 1:22
    
@tiagoinu Sorry, in the previous comment I was wrong. Dho! –  user502052 Feb 28 '11 at 1:25
2  
I voted this up because it is the correct solution. The key management problems are going to be murder otherwise. –  peejaybee Feb 28 '11 at 1:27
    
What is the higher level problem you're trying to solve? I think you're lost in the weeds. –  Winfield Feb 28 '11 at 2:20
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