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I have this table (simplified)

 ID  | Field1
---------------------------------
 2   | Cat     
 2   | Goat
 6   | Cat
 6   | Dog 

I need to find the IDs where a record exists whose value for field1 is cat and for the same id, another record exists whose value is Goat. In this case, it would only return ID 2.

Doing something like below will not work. where Field1='Cat' and Field1='Goat'

I'm guessing I need some sort of subquery here? I'm not entirely sure. (Using SQL Server 2008)

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5 Answers 5

Use:

  SELECT t.id
    FROM YOUR_TABLE t
   WHERE t.field1 IN ('Cat', 'Goat')
GROUP BY t.id
  HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT t.field1) = 2

The key here is using COUNT (DISTINCT ...) to get a count of the field1 values. Doesn't matter if a user has Cat 3x, and dog 1x... unless you need to filter those out?

Another option is INTERSECT, which returns any distinct values that are returned by both the query on the left and right sides of the INTERSECT operand:

SELECT a.id 
  FROM YOUR_TABLE a 
 WHERE a.field1 = 'Cat'
INTERSECT
SELECT b.id 
  FROM YOUR_TABLE b 
 WHERE b.field1 = 'Goat'
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Thank you, I like the simplicity in using Intersect. Is this method less efficient than the query using group by/having? –  James Bloss Feb 28 '11 at 2:14
1  
@James There are more cases where INTERSECT performs poorly when compared to HAVING than the reverse. The 3rd option JOIN (Cybernate) can also perform better than INTERSECT, but still normally slower than HAVING. It looks pretty, but if you want performance at all, stay away from it. –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 28 '11 at 2:45

Try this:

SELECT id FROM
(
 SELECT id FROM <YOUR_TABLE> WHERE Field1 = 'Cat'
 INTERSECT
 SELECT id FROM <YOUR_TABLE> WHERE Field1 = 'Goat'
) a

Alternative:

SELECT a.ID 
  FROM <YOUR_TABLE> a INNER JOIN <YOUR_TABLE> b 
    ON a.ID = b.ID
WHERE a.Field1 = 'CAT'
  AND b.Field1 = 'GOAT'
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A JOIN seems overkill -- two passes over the table when you only need a GROUP BY & HAVING clause in a single query. –  OMG Ponies Feb 28 '11 at 2:09
    
Tht's why I have given it as an alternate option..if OP is not aware of INTERSECT.. –  Chandu Feb 28 '11 at 2:13
    
@omg, @cyb There are cases where the JOIN will be faster. If one of the values occurs 20 times as much as the other, HAVING will collect all the data, whereas JOIN will start with the lesser, bookmark lookup the record and filter by the other value. –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 28 '11 at 2:47
    
I would use the JOIN as it seems more natural to me -- it is the responsibility of the RDBMS (and appropriate indexes) to provide "performance". –  user166390 Feb 28 '11 at 3:00
    
@pst: A single scan of the table is often the most efficient -- why do twice, what you can do once? But as always, test & compare to be sure because situations can be very different. –  OMG Ponies Feb 28 '11 at 3:04

Use a query like this

SELECT ID FROM table INNER JOIN 
    (SELECT ID, COUNT(FILED1) AS Expr1 
       FROM table GROUP BY ID 
          HAVING COUNT(FIELD1) > 1) SR ON table.ID = SR.ID  WHERE table.FIELD1 = 'Cat'

So you just have to put a variable with a DECLARE for the 'Cat' if you want to have a more dynamic query

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SELECT DISTINCT t1.ID 
FROM table t1, table t2
WHERE t1.ID=t2.ID AND t1.Field1 <> t2.Field1
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Not tested but something like this might work

select t1.ID from tbl t1 inner join tbl t2 on t1.ID=t2.ID
where (t1.Field1='Cat' and t2.Field1='Goat')
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