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I'm far from being a database expert, so please feel free to let me know I'm doing it entirely wrong. I'm trying to create a set of tables that has the following basic rules:

There are companies, managers and employees. Managers can only belong to one company, but employees can belong to more then one manager. The table structure I've come up with is something like this:

# Companies
  company_id
  company_name

# Managers
  manager_id
  company_id

# Employees
  employee_id
  company_id
  employee_name

# Managed By
  employee_id
  manager_id

Does this structure seem reasonable? I thought I need something like "Managed By" since an employee can have multiple managers.

What I'm boggling on is now how do I manage to grab the records I'd want. For example:

  • Get all employee names belonging to a certain manager
  • Get all employee names belonging to two certain managers
  • All employees to the same company

edit: I think I'm getting the queries figured out but this still feels unweidy, so any help on the table structure would be appreciated.

The fact I'm having problems writing queries for this information makes me think I've done something fundamentally wrong with the table structure. Hopefully someone here can set me right?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generally, the scheme is correct. The one possibility that does exist, however, is that you could have data where an employee is managed by managers at more than two companies.

For your queries:

select distinct Employees.employee_name as name from Employees, Managers, ManagedBy where Managers.manager_id = X and ManagedBy.manager_id = Managers.manager_id and Employees.employee_id = ManagedBy.employee_id;

and

select distinct Employees.employee_name as name from Employees, Managers, ManagedBy where (Managers.manager_id = X or Managers.manager_id = Y) and ManagedBy.manager_id = Managers.manager_id and Employees.employee_id = ManagedBy.employee_id;

where X and Y are the manager IDs you want.

edit: I know you crossed out the queries you wanted, but the third one is this:

select distinct Employees.employee_name as name from Employees where Employees.company_id = Z;

where Z is the company ID you want.

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All employees to the same company

SELECT employee_id, employee_name, company_name 
FROM Employees 
LEFT JOIN Companies ON Employees.company_id = Companies.company_id
WHERE Companies.company_id = ????
or if you pulling by name
WHERE Companies.company_name = 'ABC'

Get all employee names belonging to a certain manager

SELECT employee_id, employee_name, manager_id 
FROM Employees 
LEFT JOIN Managed_By ON Employees.employee_id = Managed_By.employee_id
WHERE Managed_By.manager_id = ????

manager_name in Managers table would be nice to have

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