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UPDATE

So far I've cut it down significantly:

  # Gets the user's Wall
  # I used object methods so they can be called by other methods, such as #second_wall()
  def read_wall(fbuserid)
     @result ||= graph.get_connections(fbuserid, 'feed')
  end

  def second_wall(fbuserid)
     @second ||= @result.next_page
  end

  def third_wall(fbuserid)
     @third ||= @second.next_page
  end

  def fourth_wall(fbuserid)
       fourth ||= @third.next_page
   end

  # Collects your friends' wall Posts and puts the IDs into an array
  # the number array contains method names that will be called
  # This is done to read 100 wall posts
  def get_post_ids(fbuserid)
     var = []   
     number = [read_wall(fbuserid), second_wall(fbuserid), third_wall(fbuserid), fourth_wall(fbuserid)]
     number.each do |iterate|
        num ||= iterate
        for i in 0..25
           if find_nil(num, [i,'id']).nil? == false
              var << num[i]['id']
           end
        end
     end

Originally, I had everything in the base method #read_wall(). I'm not sure what happened with the array, but when I tried:

array = result + second + third + fourth. I was left with data from only the original result. So I created this working disaster. Can you please help me refactor this?

   # Gets the user's Wall
      def read_wall(fbuserid)
         result ||= graph.get_connections(fbuserid, 'feed')
      end

  def second_wall(fbuserid)
     result ||= graph.get_connections(fbuserid, 'feed')
     second ||= result.next_page
  end

  def third_wall(fbuserid)
       result ||= graph.get_connections(fbuserid, 'feed')
       second ||= result.next_page
       third ||= second.next_page
  end

  def fourth_wall(fbuserid)
        result ||= graph.get_connections(fbuserid, 'feed')
        second ||= result.next_page
        third ||= second.next_page
        fourth ||= third.next_page
   end

  # Collects your friends' wall Posts and puts the IDs into an array
  def get_post_ids(fbuserid)
     x ||= read_wall(fbuserid)
     var = []
     for i in 0..25
        if find_nil(x, [i,'id']).nil? == false
           var << x[i]['id']
        end
     end

     second_wall ||= second_wall(fbuserid)
       for i in 0..25
          if find_nil(second_wall, [i,'id']).nil? == false
             var << second_wall[i]['id']
          end
       end

      third_wall ||= third_wall(fbuserid)
        for i in 0..25
           if find_nil(third_wall, [i,'id']).nil? == false
              var << third_wall[i]['id']
           end
        end

      fourth_wall ||= fourth_wall(fbuserid)
         for i in 0..25
            if find_nil(fourth_wall, [i,'id']).nil? == false
                 var << fourth_wall[i]['id']
            end
         end

      @get_post_ids = var
  end
share|improve this question
3  
I've voted to close - would this question be suitable for the Code Review Stack Exchange? – Andrew Grimm Feb 28 '11 at 5:19
1  
This is a challenging metaprogramming question. – user398520 Feb 28 '11 at 5:21
1  
@Jordan This isn't "challenging meta-programming"; cleaning this up is trivial – meagar Feb 28 '11 at 6:24
    
Sarcasm was missed. Deleted it.... – Jordan Dea-Mattson Feb 28 '11 at 7:14

As a hint, rather repeating the body of a loop four times on four different arrays, you can make an array of arrays.

Instead of this:

for x in array1
  function1(x);
end

for x in array2
  function1(x);
end

you can do this:

[array1,array2].each do |array|
  for x in array 
    function1(x)
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This might be helpful. My loops in loops have caused a performance disaster. – user398520 Feb 28 '11 at 6:43

Adding a helper function for each specific page does seem like a code smell in this case. It may not always be a problem if you were referring say user.second_wall very often and needed a quick way to get to it. However, by linking each such function,

read_wall -> second_wall -> third_wall -> fourth_wall

it will become incrementally hard to expand and maintain this. Maybe have a base function that can retrieve the wall posts given any user and the desired range.

get_wall_posts(user_id, range)

To get the first 100 wall posts, and mapping the id's would look something like,

first_100_posts = get_wall_posts(some_user, 0...100);
first_100_ids = first_100_posts.map { |post| post['id'] }

One of the most important part of refactoring is to give good names to identifiers. Names such as var and iterate usually don't say much about the code. It is similar to, if not worse, than comments like,

// increment i by 1
i++;

Consistency is just as important. Groups of methods that do similar things should be named in a consistent manner. read_wall and second_wall seem to have a disconnect for me because the verb read missing from the other methods. read_second_wall sounds like a better name, and more inline with the rest.

Another thing to consider in mind with the current design is object consistency. Currently some of the methods are linked by a process (getting the first 100 or 4 pages worth of posts) and not by their individual role, making them dependent on each other. Calling second_wall without calling read_wall will yield different results because the result property has not been initialized yet. That can result in difficult to find bugs because there is another dimension to keep track of - whether object are used in the order expected.

Try to limit the side-effects of functions as much as possible. If an objected must be used in a certain order, then use the state pattern or anything similar to ensure that.

share|improve this answer

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