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In the following code, we have to join the url.path and url.query ourselves using the ? character? Is there a more elegant way to do it? I have to use net/http because in some situations I want to put a string in the header for the user-agent as well.

require 'net/http'

url_string = 'http://www.time.gov/timezone.cgi?Pacific/d/-8'

url = URI.parse(url_string)

response = Net::HTTP.start(url.host, url.port) do |http|
  http.get(url.path + '?' + url.query)
end
puts response.body[/<td.*(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d)/, 1]
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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use the request_uri method on the URI object:

http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib/libdoc/uri/rdoc/classes/URI/HTTP.html#M009499

Updated version of your code:

require 'net/http'

url_string = 'http://www.time.gov/timezone.cgi?Pacific/d/-8'

url = URI.parse(url_string)

response = Net::HTTP.start(url.host, url.port) do |http|
  http.get(url.request_uri)
end
puts response.body[/<td.*(\d\d:\d\d:\d\d)/, 1]
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hm, you mean we have to use newuri = URI::HTTP.build([nil, "www.example.com", nil, "/path", "query", 'fragment']), and then we can now invoke request_uri to get the path with query? That's a lot of work just to combine them together. Or do you mean another way... if possible can you post your code that works like the original code? –  動靜能量 Feb 28 '11 at 6:09
1  
Updated original post with code. –  ctcherry Feb 28 '11 at 6:13
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You can use URI#request_uri

From the docs:

Returns the full path for an HTTP request, as required by Net::HTTP::Get.

If the URI contains a query, the full path is URI#path + ’?’ + URI#query. Otherwise, the path is simply URI#path.

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ctcherry also have the same solution... can you see the comment for ctcherry for using it? –  動靜能量 Feb 28 '11 at 6:11
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Net/http may make a good foundation but it's not very user-friendly.

If your client is accessing a well-designed service, then something like ActiveResource, rest-client, or HTTParty will be a better choice. You could also write an application-independent module that civilizes net/http in a way that works well for you.

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