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all. how can we get the status result in shell? I tried git status but it always return 0, even we have commit.

git status
echo $?  #this is always 0

I have an idea but I think it is rather a bad idea.

if [ git status | grep -i -c "[a-z]"> 2 ];
then
 code for change...
else
  code for nothing change...
fi

any other way?


update,and now this solve see Mark Longair 's post

I tried this , but cause an problem.

if [ -z $(git status --porcelain) ];
then
    echo "IT IS CLEAN"
else
    echo "PLEASE COMMIT YOUR CHANGE FIRST!!!"
    echo git status
fi

when the

it will get some error , [: ??: binary operator expected

now , I am looking at man and try the git diff.

===================code for my hope, and hope better answer======================

#if [ `git status | grep -i -c "$"` -lt 3 ];
# change to below code,although the above code is simple, but I think it is not strict logical
if [ `git diff --cached --exit-code HEAD^ > /dev/null && (git ls-files --other --exclude-standard --directory | grep -c -v '/$')` ];
then
        echo "PLEASE COMMIT YOUR CHANGE FIRST!!!"
    exit 1

else
    exit 0
fi
share|improve this question
    
I've updated the question title a little. Let me know if this is what you mean. –  Noufal Ibrahim Feb 28 '11 at 7:47
2  
In the updated section, it seems that you're not actually doing what eckes suggests in his answer - as he says, you need to put double-quotes around the $(git status --porcelain). Also, if you want to put exclamation marks in your message, you'll need to use single quotes rather than double quotes - i.e. it should be echo 'PLEASE COMMIT YOUR CHANGE FIRST!!!' instead –  Mark Longair Feb 28 '11 at 10:13
1  
as Mark says: you need to put double quotes around the $(git status --porcelain), just as I told you! –  eckes Feb 28 '11 at 10:28
    
This questions would be a lot more useful, if it didn't include parts of answers. –  oberlies Nov 26 '12 at 8:58
    
@9nix00 do what you have been told and edit and fix the bug in your shell script above: BUG: if [ -z $(some command) ] FIX: if [ -z "$(some command)" ] –  MarcH Feb 15 at 14:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 47 down vote accepted

An alternative to testing whether the output of git status --porcelain is empty is to test each condition you care about separately. One might not always care, for example, if there are untracked files in the output of git status.

For example, to see if there are any local unstaged changes, you can look at the return code of:

git diff --exit-code

To check if there are any changes that are staged but not committed, you can use the return code of:

git diff --cached --exit-code

Finally, if you want to know about whether there are any untracked files in your working tree that aren't ignored, you can test whether the output of the following command is empty:

git ls-files --other --exclude-standard --directory

Update: You ask below whether you can change that command to exclude the directories in the output. You can exclude empty directories by adding --no-empty-directory, but to exclude all directories in that output I think you'll have to filter the output, such as with:

git ls-files --other --exclude-standard --directory | egrep -v '/$'

The -v to egrep means to only output lines that don't match the pattern, and the pattern matches any line that ends with a /.

share|improve this answer
    
I leaned these tips and have an issue. that is , use git ls-files --other --exclude-standard --directory get the list include directories. is there someway exclude these directory? –  9nix00 Feb 28 '11 at 10:26
    
@9nix00: I've updated my answer to explain how to do that –  Mark Longair Feb 28 '11 at 11:34
    
yes , this is I want . and I update my post for new script-code. I thinks yours suggest is more strict logical although more code lol... and Hope better answers appear. –  9nix00 Mar 1 '11 at 6:42
    
Where is --exit-code documented? –  albfan Nov 8 at 11:11
    
@albfan: it's in the git-diff man page: "Make the program exit with codes similar to diff(1). That is, it exits with 1 if there were differences and 0 means no differences." –  Mark Longair Nov 8 at 14:30

The return value of git status just tells you the exit code of git status, not if there are any modifications to be committed.

If you want a more computer-readable version of the git status output, try

git status --porcelain

See the description of git status for more information about that.

Sample use (script simply tests if git status --porcelain gives any output, no parsing needed):

if [ -n "$(git status --porcelain)" ]; then 
  echo "there are changes"; 
else 
  echo "no changes";
fi

Please note that you have to quote the string to test, i.e. the output of git status --porcelain. For more hints about test constructs, refer to the Advanced Bash Scripting Guide (Section string comparison).

share|improve this answer
    
hi,you give a good suggestion, I tried it, but in script ,it cause some problem , I improved it , if we use this if [ -z $(git status --porcelain) ]; it will get some error , [: ??: binary operator expected I find the manual and use this if [ -z $(git status --short) ]; this can work, thanks! –  9nix00 Feb 28 '11 at 7:52
    
@9nix00: see edited post. –  eckes Feb 28 '11 at 7:55
    
sorry, there is still cause problem. when the commit is clean. use porcelain and short both ok. but when commit isn't clean. it will cause error. [: ??: binary operator expected. I think maybe we should try use base64 to encode it. let me try! downloading base64 command tools .... lol –  9nix00 Feb 28 '11 at 7:57
3  
@9nix00: stop. Why do you want to Base64 encode something? –  eckes Feb 28 '11 at 8:02
    
it cause problem when the commit is not clean. –  9nix00 Feb 28 '11 at 8:59

If you are like me, you want to know if there are:

1) changes to existing files 2) newly added files 3) deleted files

and specifically do not want to know about 4) untracked files.

This should do it:

git status --untracked-files=no --porcelain

Here's my bash code to exit the script if the repo is clean:

[[ $(git status --untracked-files=no --porcelain 2> /dev/null | tail -n1) = "" ]] && echo "this branch is clean, no need to push..." && kill -SIGINT $$;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for —untracked-files=no; I think your test can be simplified to [[ -z $(git status --untracked-files=no --porcelain) ]]. git status shouldn't write to stderr, unless something fundamental goes wrong - and then you do want to see that output. (If you wanted more robust behavior in that event, append || echo no to the command substitution so that the test for cleanness still fails). String comparisons / the -z operator can deal with multi-line strings - no need for tail. –  mklement0 Oct 20 at 4:55
1  
thanks @mklement0, even a bit shorter: [[ -z $(git status -u no --porcelain) ]] –  moodboom Oct 21 at 1:03

From the git source code there is a sh script which includes the following.

require_clean_work_tree () {
    git rev-parse --verify HEAD >/dev/null || exit 1
    git update-index -q --ignore-submodules --refresh
    err=0

    if ! git diff-files --quiet --ignore-submodules
    then
        echo >&2 "Cannot $1: You have unstaged changes."
        err=1
    fi

    if ! git diff-index --cached --quiet --ignore-submodules HEAD --
    then
        if [ $err = 0 ]
        then
            echo >&2 "Cannot $1: Your index contains uncommitted changes."
        else
            echo >&2 "Additionally, your index contains uncommitted changes."
        fi
        err=1
    fi

    if [ $err = 1 ]
    then
        test -n "$2" && echo >&2 "$2"
        exit 1
    fi
}

This sniplet shows how its possible to use git diff-files and git diff-index to find out if there are any changes to previously known files. It does not however allow you to find out if a new unknown file has been added to the working tree.

share|improve this answer
    
this works fine except for new files . we can add this. if ! git ls-files --other --exclude-standard --directory | grep -c -v '/$' then exit 0 else echo "please commit your new file,if you don't want add it, please add it in git-ignore file." exit 1 fi –  9nix00 Mar 1 '11 at 8:43
    
Just if [ -n "$(git ls-files --others --exclude-standard)" ] without any additional piping or greping should be enough to detect untracked files. –  Arrowmaster Mar 1 '11 at 9:10

It's possible to combine git status --porcelain with a simple grep to perform the test.

if git status --porcelain | grep .; then
    echo Repo is dirty
else
    echo Repo is clean
fi

I use this as a simple one-liner sometimes:

# pull from origin if our repo is clean
git status --porcelain | grep . || git pull origin master

Add -qs to your grep command to make it silent.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for elegance; slight caveat: should git status fail fatally (e.g., a corrupted repo), your test will mistakenly report a clean workspace. One option is to use git status --porcelain 2>&1, but that would 'eat' the error message if you used grep with -q. (Dealing with that would lose the elegance: (git status --porcelain || echo err) | grep -q .) –  mklement0 Oct 20 at 5:16

Not pretty, but works:

git status | grep -qF 'working directory clean' || echo "DIRTY"

Not sure whether the message is locale dependent, so maybe put a LANG=C in front.

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