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db.open(function(err,db){
  //handle error
  db.collection("book",function(err, collection){
     //handle error
     collection.doSomething1(... function(err, result){
         //handle error
         collection.doSomething2(... function(err, result){
            ...
         })
     })
  })
})

but we wont wrote db.open every time when we want do something, but we must make sure that db has opened when we use it.

we still wont like handle error every time in the same code.

we can also reuse the collection.

just like this

errorHandledDB.doSomething1("book",... function(result){
    errorHandledDB.doSomething2("book",...function(result){
        ...
    })
})
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3 Answers 3

I implemented a server-application using mongodb for logging. I implemented data access using some provider classes, as shown in the example.

provider.filelog.js

var Db= require('mongodb/db').Db,
  ObjectID= require('mongodb/bson/bson').ObjectID,
  Server= require('mongodb/connection').Server,
  log = require('lib/common').log;

FilelogProvider = function (host, port, database) {
  this.db= new Db(database, new Server(host, port, {auto_reconnect: true}, {}));
  this.db.open(function(){});
};

FilelogProvider.prototype.getCollection= function(callback) {
  this.db.collection('filelogs', function(error, log_collection) {
    if (error) callback(error);
    else {
      log_collection.ensureIndex([[ 'created', 1 ]], false, function(err, indexName) {
        if (error) callback(error);
        callback(null, log_collection);
      });
    }
  });
};

FilelogProvider.prototype.findAll = function(callback) {
    this.getCollection(function(error, log_collection) {
      if (error) callback(error);
      else {
        log_collection.find(function(error, cursor) {
          if (error) callback(error);
          else {
            cursor.toArray(function(error, results) {
              if (error) callback(error);
              else callback(null, results);
            });
          }
        });
      }
    });
};

Since i use Grasshopper as my http-middleware, i can easily inject the providers using the DI functionality provided by gh:

server.js

gh.addToContext({
  providers: {
      filelog: new FilelogProvider(conf.mongodb_host, conf.mongodb_port, conf.mongodb_database),
      status: new ServerstatusProvider(conf.mongodb_host, conf.mongodb_port, conf.mongodb_database)
  },
  log: log
});

Accessing the providers in every controller function is now a breeze:

gh.get('/serve',  function() {
  this.providers.filelog.findAll(function(err, res) {
    // access data here
  });
});

This implementation is pretty specific to Grasshopper (as it's using DI) but i think you'll get the idea. I also implemented a solution using express and mongoose, you find it here. This solution is a bit cleaner than using the native driver, as it exposes models to use against the database.

Update

Just for the sake of it: if you really want to stick to the DRY-principle, stop tinkering on an ORM implementation yourself and use Mongoose. If you need special functionality like Map/Reduce, you still can use the native driver (on which Mongoose is built).

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but getCollection will call twice if do another operation in callack –  guilin 桂林 Feb 28 '11 at 9:05
1  
it was no concern in my implementation, but you could introduce some kind of caching to fetch the collection just once (for example saving the collection to a member of your provider). After it was fetched for the first time, you just check if the member is null and return it instead of re-fetching the collection. –  schaermu Feb 28 '11 at 9:47
    
I think it not DRY –  guilin 桂林 Mar 3 '11 at 3:18
    
@guilin: you can get the collection and save it to this.collection, and use this.collection everywhere else. Create a helper function in the class that does if ( this.collection != 'undefined' ){ //get the collection and save to this.collection }. you'll then have to call that helper at the top of every method –  Vanwaril Mar 9 '11 at 3:46
    
I choose mongoose now, however, thanks all you guys –  guilin 桂林 Mar 9 '11 at 9:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Answer my own question. Because there is no more good options, I do it myself, I start a project to simplify it, check node-mongoskin.

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I'm talking theoretically here, with no regards to mongo.

I would recommend you to try building a wrapping of a kind.

A Data access layer or at least models, it all depends on your architecture and needs, and that's on your side.

Just wrap the access to mongodb with a layer of abstract commands, than write an abstract model object and all other model objects will inherit from it, and will automatically set all getters and setters for the attributes of the record you pulled from the mongo db.

for updating you just give it a save method, that iterates and saves all the changes made to it.

Since it's not a relational and I don't know if this is well suited for your design, the model may not be useful here.

Hope this helps, Good luck!

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