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Is there a way to get the float value of a string like this: 75,25 €, other than parsefloat(str_replace(',', '.', $var))?

I want this to be dependent on the current site language, and sometimes the comma could be replaced by dot.

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What about regex? –  Benubird Feb 28 '11 at 8:58
    
Well there will be localisation issues with regex. –  Hamish Feb 28 '11 at 9:18
    
you can use the solution attached at stackoverflow.com/questions/7407946/… –  mcuadros Nov 4 '13 at 16:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

You can use

Example from Manual:

$formatter = new NumberFormatter('de_DE', NumberFormatter::CURRENCY);
var_dump($formatter->parseCurrency("75,25 €", $curr));

gives: float(75.25)

Note that the intl extension is not enabled by default. Please refer to the Installation Instructions.

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3  
+1 This is a great way of doing it but PHP 5.3 only. This might be a huge constraint –  Ben Feb 28 '11 at 9:19
1  
@Ben PHP5.2 has reached end of support. Also, the intl extension is available in PECL before PHP 5.3, so the version is not an issue. –  Gordon Feb 28 '11 at 9:21
2  
excellent response –  Edson Medina Mar 27 '12 at 18:34

use ereg_replace

$string = "$100,000";
$int = ereg_replace("[^0-9]", "", $string); 
echo $int;

outputs

1000000

function toInt($str)
{
    return (int)preg_replace("/\..+$/i", "", preg_replace("/[^0-9\.]/i", "", $str));
}

Update


<?php
$string = array("$1,000,000.00","$1 000 000.00","1,000 000.00","$123","$123 456 789","0.15¢");
foreach($string as $s) {
    echo $s . " = " . toInt($s) . "\n"; 
}
function toInt($str)
{
    return preg_replace("/([^0-9\\.])/i", "", $str);
}
?>

Outputs

$1,000,000.00 = 1000000.00
$1 000 000.00 = 1000000.00
1,000 000.00 = 1000000.00
$123 = 123
$123 456 789 = 123456789
0.15¢ = 0.15

and if you cast it as an integer

<?php
$string = array("$1,000,000.00","$1 000 000.00","1,000 000.00","$123","$123 456 789","0.15¢");
foreach($string as $s) {
    echo $s . " = " . _toInt($s) . "\n";    
}
function _toInt($str)
{
    return (int)preg_replace("/([^0-9\\.])/i", "", $str);
}
?>

outputs

$1,000,000.00 = 1000000
$1 000 000.00 = 1000000
1,000 000.00 = 1000000
$123 = 123
$123 456 789 = 123456789
0.15¢ = 0

So there you have it. single line, one replace. you're good to go.

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2  
Thanks very much. I was hoping I could get away with not using regex, but it's not a performance-critical task, so this is fine. Also, ereg_replace() is deprecated - use preg_replace() instead :-) –  Bojangles Sep 13 '11 at 20:29
3  
Might wanna add . to the regex to otherwise $100.00 would equal 10000. –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 13 '11 at 20:30
    
sorry, I'm too used to the 5.2 days. –  rlemon Sep 13 '11 at 20:31
    
Mainly as reference, I've got this function. Is there a way to shrink it into one line? –  Bojangles Sep 13 '11 at 20:58
1  
@JamWaffles, yup.. there it is. –  rlemon Sep 13 '11 at 20:59

This is a bit more complex/slow solution, but works with all locales. Because the @rlenom's solution work only with dots as decimal separator, and some locales, like spanish one, uses the comma as decimal separator.

<?php

public function getAmount($money)
{
    $cleanString = preg_replace('/([^0-9\.,])/i', '', $money);
    $onlyNumbersString = preg_replace('/([^0-9])/i', '', $money);

    $separatorsCountToBeErased = strlen($cleanString) - strlen($onlyNumbersString) - 1;

    $stringWithCommaOrDot = preg_replace('/([,\.])/', '', $cleanString, $separatorsCountToBeErased);
    $removedThousendSeparator = preg_replace('/(\.|,)(?=[0-9]{3,}$)/', '',  $stringWithCommaOrDot);

    return (float) str_replace(',', '.', $removedThousendSeparator);
}

Tests:

['1,10 USD', 1.10],
['1 000 000.00', 1000000.0],
['$1 000 000.21', 1000000.21],
['£1.10', 1.10],
['$123 456 789', 123456789.0],
['$123,456,789.12', 123456789.12],
['$123 456 789,12', 123456789.12],
['1.10', 1.1],
[',,,,.10', .1],
['1.000', 1000.0],
['1,000', 1000.0]

Caveats: Fails if the decimal part have more than two digits.

This is an implementation from this library: https://github.com/mcuadros/currency-detector

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This is actually the best solution and should be the accepted answer... –  Phil Thomas Nov 4 '13 at 9:28
    
Brilliant solution, thank you. The test cases are appreciated –  Bojangles Nov 4 '13 at 13:07
    
FYI: merged here from stackoverflow.com/questions/7407946/… –  Shog9 Nov 18 '13 at 7:25
1  
+1 for this solution, works for me even with French Canadian numbers: $fr_num = "180,000,08 $"; returns: double(180000.08) –  Steve Jan 15 '14 at 14:26

You're gonna need to remove the currency symbol from the string. PHP's intval stops at the 1st non-numeric character it finds.

$int = intval(preg_replace('/[^\d\.]/', '', '$100')); // 100

Though if you have a value like $100.25, you might wanna use floatval instead.

$float = floatval(preg_replace('/[^\d\.]/', '', '$100.25')); // 100.25
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IMHO this is the best answer –  Timo Huovinen Jul 11 '13 at 11:28
    
FYI: merged here from stackoverflow.com/questions/7407946/… –  Shog9 Nov 18 '13 at 7:25

PHP has intval (here are the docs), which is (as far as I can tell) exactly the same as JavaScript's parseInt.

However, for what's worth, I don't think either function will help you with what you're trying to do. Because the first character is non-numeric, both freak out (PHP will give you 0, JS will give you NaN). So in either language, you're going to have to do some string/regex parsing.

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FYI: merged here from stackoverflow.com/questions/7407946/… –  Shog9 Nov 18 '13 at 7:25

Casting is your friend:

$int = (int) $string;

Update based on op:

Try something like this:

<?php

function extract_numbers($string)
{
    return preg_replace("/[^0-9]/", '', $string);
}

echo extract_numbers('$100');

?>

Demo: http://codepad.org/QyrfS7WE

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Will that work when the string contains other non-numeric characters like the OP's examples? –  Oliver Charlesworth Sep 13 '11 at 20:22
2  
(int) '$100' === 0 –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 13 '11 at 20:23
    
@Rocket -- hmmm i see that now... looking into it –  Neal Sep 13 '11 at 20:23
    
I experimented with this before I posted my question, but it didn't work - I get the same result as @Rocket. –  Bojangles Sep 13 '11 at 20:24
1  
Might wanna add . to the regex to otherwise $100.00 would equal 10000. –  Rocket Hazmat Sep 13 '11 at 20:30

I had a similar problem where I didn't receive the currency symbol, just the strings (ie: 1,234,567.89 or 1.234.567,89).

This helped me normalize both cases into floats:

$val = str_replace(",", ".", $formatted);
$val = preg_replace("/[\,\.](\d{3})/", "$1", $val);

But Gordon's answer is much cleaner.

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I've left something more specific here: stackoverflow.com/a/13112263/367456 - however it does not handle any currency symbols around the number itself. –  hakre Oct 28 '12 at 19:40
    
then just add this to filter out all non-digit and non-separator characters: preg_replace ('/[^\d\,\.]/', '', $val); –  Edson Medina Oct 29 '12 at 9:59

I'm an newbie, so there's probably an obvious (to others, not me) downside to the approach below, but thought I would share it anyway. I'd be interested to know whether it's faster or slower than using preg_replace, but didn't do any speed testing.

$badChars = array("$", ",", "(", ")");
$dirtyString = "($3,895.23)";
$cleanString = str_ireplace($badChars, "", $dirtyString);
echo "$dirtyString becomes $cleanString<p>";

$dirtyString can be an array, so:

$badChars = array("$", ",", "(", ")");
$dirtyStrings = array("($3,895.23)", "1,067.04", "$5683.22", "$9834.48");
$cleanStrings = str_ireplace($badChars, "", $dirtyStrings);

echo var_dump($cleanStrings);
share|improve this answer
    
FYI: merged here from stackoverflow.com/questions/7407946/… –  Shog9 Nov 18 '13 at 7:26

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