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I am facing one issue related to multithreading because of shared code. I want to avoid syncronization. I saw so many threads related to AtomicInteger & Semaphore. But havn't got clear idea about what way and how exactly it is better option than synchronization.

Here is my simple code which i want to make thread safe. Class to create thread.

public class ThreadCheck implements Runnable {
TestStaticVar var = new TestStaticVar();
@Override
public void run() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    try {
        var.holdOn();
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    ThreadCheck t = new ThreadCheck();
    Thread t1 = new Thread(t);
    Thread t2 = new Thread(t);
    t1.setName("A");
    t1.start();
    t2.setName("B");
    t2.start();
}}

Class to be executed by multiple threads.

public class TestStaticVar {
Semaphore sem = new Semaphore(1);
public void holdOn() throws InterruptedException{
    sem.acquire();

    System.out.println("Inside Hold on....."+Thread.currentThread().getName()+"==> ");//+i.get());
    try {
          for (long i=0; i<Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) {

        }
         System.out.println(var1.toString());
    } catch (Exception e) {
    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    System.out.println("Finished Hold on===="+Thread.currentThread().getName());
              sem.release(1);
    System.out.println("Execution Completed by =====> "+Thread.currentThread().getName());
}}

Any help is highly appriciate.

Thanks, Rajesh

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3  
Using Semaphore wouldn't help you to avoid synchronization, since it's just another synchronization primitive. Try to describe your task. –  axtavt Feb 28 '11 at 9:38
    
Use the built-in concurrent data structures or just keep your critical sections small. Better than writing some crazy code that is not obviously thread-safe. –  ide Feb 28 '11 at 9:46
    
This is just the sample code which is equivalent to actual code. I cannot use synchronization, and i cannot make the object immutable. Is there any other way to achieve the same functionality as that of synchronize. –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 9:46
1  
@Rajesh S, Your example needs to show why locking is required at all and what the interactions is. e.g. multiple readers/one writer, or one reader/multiple writers. is access by field in objects, on a Map, a queue or can the work be restructured differently. You haven't explained why you cannot use synchronization. Unless this is an assignment/homework, you can use synchronization. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 28 '11 at 9:50
    
@Peter :- This is just the sample code which is equivalent to actual code. The long loop could be anything. In my case its database call to remote server and response could vary depending on network traffic and after recieving data i am processing some variable where actually i am getting error. Is there any other way to achieve the same functionality as that of synchronize. –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 9:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The two main reasons to try to avoid synchronize blocks are performance and protecting yourself from deadlocks.

Using the synchronize keyword involves performance overhead in setting up the locks and protecting the synchronized operation. While there is a performance penalty for calling a synchronized block, there's a much bigger hit that gets taken when the JVM has to manage resource contention for that block.

The classes in java.util.concurrent.atomic can use machine level atomic instructions rather than locking, making them much faster than code that would use locks. See the javadoc for the package for more information on how that works.

Also, as u3050 mentioned, avoiding mutable shared state goes a long way to preventing the need for synchronization.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for unformated code... i am new to STACK Overflow... AtomicInteger i = new AtomicInteger(0); public void holdOn() throws InterruptedException{ if(i.compareAndSet(0, 1)){ System.out.println("Inside Hold on....."+Thread.currentThread().getName()+"==> ");//+i.get()); try { for (long i=0; i<Integer.MAX_VALUE; i++) { } } catch (Exception e) { // TODO Auto-generated catch block e.printStackTrace(); } i.compareAndSet(1, 0); } }..... IS this s right implementation if the single object is used amongs the thread. –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 10:21
    
Use incrementAndGet, not ++. I don't see the need for the compareAndSet calls either. –  Jason Gritman Feb 28 '11 at 10:32
    
i think i++ is a counter for for loop and my code should be thread safe from if block. Could you please elaborate little on incrementAndGet and how it is helpful in avoiding multiple access? –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 10:59

One way to avoid synchronization is to make every resource immutable which would be accessed by multiple threads. Making class/object immutable makes sure its threadsafe.

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How you avoid synchronization depending on the situation. As your situation is contrived and doesn't do anything which needs locking, the simplest thing to do is remove the lock i.e. only lock when you need to. (Also remove the long loop which doesn't do anything) Then your application will run much faster.

share|improve this answer
    
This is just the sample code which is equivalent to actual code. The long loop could be anything. In my case its database call to remote server and response could vary depending on network traffic. Is there any other way to achieve the same functionality as that of synchronize. –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 9:50
    
There are many ways to avoid locking but they depend on what you doing. If you are waiting for a database, why are you holding a lock? Does your database not support locking/transactionality? –  Peter Lawrey Feb 28 '11 at 9:53
    
BTW: The cost of accessing a database is likely to be 10,000x as expensive as synchronization. Unless you can eliminate the access to the database, I don't see then point of removing synchronization. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 28 '11 at 9:55
    
May be confused with sample code and with description. Here is actual situation. I have some code which is used to get some data from the database and after that process the data(may change with with diffrent thread call) with some local variables. I am getting some exception while processing the variable bcoz of multiple threads accessing the same variable. I know this can be acheived using synchronization. But i am looking for some other option which can be better than the synchronization. Synchronization is the last option to use. –  RajeshS Feb 28 '11 at 10:04
    
I suggest you start with correctness first. You can structure your data so you don't get an Exception, even if it is not valid (that is a harder issue). You can use the concurrency library for collections and AtomicInteger/Reference to avoid locks. However the biggest performance issue is likely to be your access to the database which will be more expensive that anything else you are likely to do. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 28 '11 at 10:26

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