Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm getting some weird behavior with a vector in C++ I was hoping someone could help me out. I have a vector like so:

vector<Instruction*> allInstrs; 

the struct for Instruction is as follows:

struct Instruction : simple_instr
{
    InstrType type;
    Instruction(const simple_instr& simple) : simple_instr(simple) 
    {
        type = Simple;
        loopHeader = false;
        loopTail = false;
    }
    int Id;
    bool loopHeader;
    bool loopTail;
};

the problem I'm having is this:

I need to iterate through each instruction and pull out specific fields and use those to do some analysis on the instructions in the vector. To do that, I was basically doing

VariableList Variables;

void GenerateVariableList()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < allInstrs.size(); i++)
        {           
             Variables.Add(allInstrs[i]);
        }
        Variables.RemoveDuplicates();
    }

Variable List is defined as

struct VariableList
{
    void Add(simple_instr* instr)
    {
        PrintOpcode(instr);
        switch(instr->opcode)
            {
                case STR_OP:
                case MCPY_OP:
                    Add(instr->u.base.src1);
                    Add(instr->u.base.src2);
                    break;              
                case LDC_OP: 
                    Add(instr->u.ldc.dst);
                    break;              
                case BTRUE_OP:
                case BFALSE_OP: 
                    Add(instr->u.bj.src);
                    break;              

                case CALL_OP:
                    cout << "CALL OP" <<endl;
                    break;

                case MBR_OP:                    
                    Add(instr->u.mbr.src);
                    break;          

                case RET_OP:
                    if (instr->u.base.src1 != NO_REGISTER)
                        Add(instr->u.base.src1);
                    break;              

                case CVT_OP:
                case CPY_OP:
                case NEG_OP:
                case NOT_OP: 
                case LOAD_OP: 
                    Add(instr->u.base.dst);
                    Add(instr->u.base.src1);
                    break;

                case LABEL_OP:
                case JMP_OP:
                    break;                      

                default:
                    Add(instr->u.base.dst);
                    Add(instr->u.base.src1);
                    Add(instr->u.base.src2);
                    break;

            }
    }

    void Add(Variable var)
    {
        variableList.push_back(var);
    }

    void RemoveDuplicates()
    {
        if (variableList.size() > 0)
        {
            variableList.erase(unique(variableList.begin(), variableList.end()), variableList.end());
            currentID = variableList.size();
        }
    }

    VariableList()
    {
        currentID = 0;
    }

    VariableList(VariableList& varList, bool setLiveness = false, bool LiveVal = false)
    {
        currentID = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < varList.size(); i++)
        {
            Variable var(varList[i]);
            if (setLiveness)
            {
                var.isLive = LiveVal;
            }
            variableList.push_back(var);
        }
    }

    Variable& operator[] (int i)
    {
        return variableList[i];
    }

    int size()
    {
        return variableList.size();
    }

    vector<Variable>::iterator begin()
    {
        return variableList.begin();
    }

    vector<Variable>::iterator end()
    {
        return variableList.end();
    }

    protected:
        int currentID;
        vector<Variable> variableList;

        void Add(simple_reg* reg, bool checkForDuplicates = false)
        {   cout << "Register Check" <<endl;
            if (reg == null)
            {
                cout << "null detected" << endl;
                return;
            }
            if (reg->kind == PSEUDO_REG)
            {   

                if (!checkForDuplicates || (checkForDuplicates && find(variableList.begin(), variableList.end(), reg->num) != variableList.end()))
                {
                    cout << "Adding... Reg  " << reg->num << endl;
                    Variable var(reg->num, currentID);

                    variableList.push_back(var);
                    currentID++;
                }
            }
        }

};

When I do this though, every instruction goes to the default case statement, even though I knwo for a fact some instructions shouldn't. If I change GenerateVariableList to

void GenerateVariableList()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < allInstrs.size(); i++)
        {   
            PrintOpcode(allInstrs[i]);
            Variables.Add(allInstrs[i]);
        }
        Variables.RemoveDuplicates();
    }

so that there is now a second PrintOpCode in addition to the one in Variables.Add, the program behaves correctly. I can't understand why adding a second PrintOpcode makes it work correctly. All print Opcode is is a function with a switch statement that just prints out a specific string depending on what the value of one of simple_instr's fields is.

VariableList Variables is contained inside of a separate struct called CFG

If you need more information/code i can provide it. If the answer is obvious I apologize, I don't program in C++ very often

EDIT:

One of the answers left, deleted now though, got me the fix.

Previously I was doing

static vector<Instruction*> ConvertLinkedListToVector(simple_instr* instructionList)
    {
        vector<Instruction*> convertedInstructions;
        int count = 0;
        for (simple_instr* current = instructionList; current; count++, current = current->next)
        {
            //Instruction* inst = new Instruction(*current);
            Instruction inst = Instruction(*current);
            inst.Id = count;
            convertedInstructions.push_back(&inst);
        }
        return convertedInstructions;
    }

to make the vector, but after reading that answer I changed it back to using "new" and it works correctly now. Thanks for the help, sorry for the dumb question heh

share|improve this question
    
Could you give us the code for the PrintOpcode code for completeness? Thanks. –  James Bedford Feb 28 '11 at 9:44
    
Can you also show the code which populates the allInstrs vector? You are storing pointers in the collection so it's probably a good idea to change it to use smart pointers. –  Tony Feb 28 '11 at 9:46
1  
Please try to restrict the code you post to a minimal example that reproduces the error. This is way too long. Try using a debugger to track down the bug. –  Björn Pollex Feb 28 '11 at 9:51
    
This may seem a simple question but have you single-stepped through the code and examined the memory at the point when your program executes in a different way to what is expected? That can be very helpful when trying to track down problems. –  Tony Feb 28 '11 at 9:51
    
We are not seeing enough code. –  CashCow Feb 28 '11 at 9:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Most likely the const simple_instr& simple passed to your constructor goes out of scope, and you keep an invalid reference/pointer to a simple_instr.

share|improve this answer
    
Would that explain why it works if I add an extra PrintOpcode statement though? That's what I can;t understand –  Megatron Feb 28 '11 at 9:53
    
That extra PrintOpcode statement will alter stack. But, without complete code, all we can do is guess. –  Erik Feb 28 '11 at 9:54
    
I don't know where you get that from, I don't see a const anywhere in his entire code, and don't see a constructor. He is deriving from simple_instr and presumably is calling new. We don't see all the code. –  CashCow Feb 28 '11 at 9:55
    
We don't see how he creates his Instruction instances. I'll delete the answer until he posts complete code though. –  Erik Feb 28 '11 at 9:58
    
Actually yes there is one "const" in the constructor but it seems he is making a copy so I doubt it is a bad reference. My biggest issue on the whole code there is the switch by type anti-pattern –  CashCow Feb 28 '11 at 12:07

Possibly not related your problem, but certainly a potential source of strange behaviour: Your Instruction(const simple_instr& simple) constructor may be getting called when you don't intend it. Mark it explicit...

explicit Instruction(const simple_instr& simple) ...

If that causes compiler errors, then that's progress :-) You might need to write a copy constructor to make them go away, and explicitly call the old constructor where you need to.

share|improve this answer
    
It's almost a copy-constructor though, I wouldn't normally make copy-constructors explicit. However here you could just copy from any Instruction into any other, which looks wrong. –  CashCow Feb 28 '11 at 10:47

So, there are several suspicious observations:

  • In your definition of VariableList you use a type called Variable - how is that type defined?
  • Iterating over a container should be done using an iterator:

for (vector<Intruction *>::iterator it = allInstrs.begin(); 
     it != allInstrs.end();
     ++it) {
    Variables.Add(*it);
}

share|improve this answer
    
don't teach the user bad habits. ++it please if you have to use hand-written loops –  CashCow Feb 28 '11 at 10:46
    
@CashCow: That is completely new to me. Wouldn't that skip the first element, and end up dereferencing a past-the-end iterator? –  Björn Pollex Feb 28 '11 at 10:48
    
No. That is a common misconception. The third part of the for statement is always executed after each execution of the loop body. –  FredOverflow Feb 28 '11 at 12:33
    
@Fred: Then I should prefer ++it to prevent a copy, is that right? –  Björn Pollex Feb 28 '11 at 12:42
    
Yes, that is what CashCow probably meant. –  FredOverflow Feb 28 '11 at 14:33

I can give you a huge general overview of "don'ts" relating to your code.

  • You are right in this case to use classes "deriving" from simple_instr but you are doing it wrong, given that later on you do a switch statement based on type. A switch-statement based on type (rather than state) is an anti-pattern. You should be calling some virtual method of your base class.

  • You almost certainly do not want your derived class to copy from the base class. You want to construct it with the parameters to construct its base-class.

  • You want a vector of the base class pointers? And to manage lifetime probably shared_ptr

  • const-correctness. Some of your methods like size() should certainly be const. For others you might want two overloads.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.