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I have some problem with this code. Notice the comments. Why that?

struct node
{
    struct node *left;
    struct node *right;
    int value;
};

static struct node root2;

int main()
{    
    struct node *root = (struct node *) malloc(sizeof(struct node));

    assert(root->left == NULL);   /* not failed. Why? */ 
    assert(root->right == NULL);  /* not failed. Why? */

    assert(root2.left == NULL);   /* not failed. Why? */
    assert(root2.right == NULL);  /* not failed. Why? */

    struct node root1;
    assert(root1.left == NULL);   /* this failed. Why? */
    assert(root1.right == NULL);  /* this failed. Why? */

    free(root);

    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

With root1, you've declared a local instance of a node, and it will be on the stack. You don't initialise it, so it will contain garbage.

With root2, you've declared a global instance. The default startup code will clear the memory that globals occupy.

With root, it will exist on the heap, and will contain garbage. It is pure luck whether the memory occupied contains 0 or not. If you use calloc instead of malloc, it will clear the memory for you.

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initialization with all 0 of root2 is required by the standard, and I never heard of a compiler which wouldn't do that. –  Jens Gustedt Feb 28 '11 at 10:56
3  
Right for root and root1. root2 should be initialized in conforming implementation (6.7.8/10). –  AProgrammer Feb 28 '11 at 10:56
    
Thanks for the clarification, guys. Will edit. –  Dave Feb 28 '11 at 11:18
1  
calloc is not standard conforming here, because NULL is not necessarily all bits zero. (See footnote 252 of the C99 Standard.) –  Jim Balter Feb 28 '11 at 11:26

Case 1:

struct node *root = (struct node *) malloc(sizeof(struct node));
assert(root->left == NULL);   /* not failed. Why? */ 
assert(root->right == NULL);  /* not failed. Why? */

This is a fluke and will generally fail. There's no guarantee that malloced memory from the heap will be zeroed - you need to calloc for that. That said, many debug runtime libraries I have seen will zero allocated memory so I can believe this works for you in debug mode. This may vary between debug and release modes.

Case 2:

static struct node root2;

Global variables are zeroed by default. I think this is guaranteed behaviour so this is correct.

Case 3:

struct node root1;
assert(root1.left == NULL);   /* this failed. Why? */
assert(root1.right == NULL);  /* this failed. Why? */

This is allocated on the stack and left uninitialised. Again there's no guarantee about the values you're left with here so you would expect this to fail.

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When you allocate a new node, its sons aren't NULLed by default. They get garbage values.
In addition, the assert macro is disabled if at the moment of including assert.h a macro with the name NDEBUG has already been defined. This allows for a coder to include many assert calls in a source code while debugging the program and then disable all of them for the production version by simply including a line like:

#define NDEBUG

at the beginning of its code, before the inclusion of assert.h.

For example:

#undef NDEBUG  
#include <assert.h>
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