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I would like to automatically weave the definition of a new function say introduced by an extending trait Ext into an abstract class A:

class Base {
    abstract class A
    class B extends A
    case class C extends A   
}

trait Ext extends Base {
    trait A extends super.A {
        def say = "hello"
    }
}

object Test extends Base with Ext {
    val b = new B
    b.say
}

However, I obtain the following error:

<console>:12: error: value say is not a member of Test.B
           b.say

Any way of doing it?

share|improve this question
    
I'm not entirely certain of what you're trying to do here (or why) - can you give an example of what exactly you're trying to solve? – Submonoid Feb 28 '11 at 11:28

It seems you are trying to use virtual classes, which is a feature not available in Scala.

Once A and B are defined they can't be redefined (like method overriding).

abstract class A
class B extends A

On the other hand, given your example, your objective could be achieved by a simple mixin. Here it is with few rewrites:

class Base {
    abstract class A
    class B extends A
    case class C extends A   
}

trait Ext extends Base {
    trait CanSay extends A {
        def say = "hello"
    }
}

object Test extends Base with Ext {
    val b = new B with CanSay
    def apply = b.say
}

Test.apply

No sure it will really help, but at least will help you understand what is going on.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, that's exactly what I'd like to avoid by having something like trait A extends super.A in order to seamlessly infer the with clause when instantiating B :-) – Romain Rouvoy Mar 2 '11 at 11:26
    
You can have class BCanSay extends B with CanSay in Exp and them do new BCanSay. – pedrofurla Mar 2 '11 at 14:51

Okay, as I said in a comment, it's not entirely clear what you're trying to do here, so I can't really try to suggest ways to do it. However, the approach you're using at the moment will not work.

Consider the class Hierarchy in this situation. At the base, we have A, which is then subclassed with B (in Base) and with Ext.A. These are not related save by their shared supertype, so you'll never find a say method on an instance of B.

The confusion possibly arises through the use of the word abstract. An abstract modifier on a class (even an inner class) does not make it an abstract member of the parent class, but denotes that it itself may have abstract members. There are ways of giving a class an abstract class member - through type parameters or type members. Unfortunately, you cannot derive from these AFAIK.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, the problem does not come from my use of the abstract keyword. I defined several subclasses inheriting from class A and I'd like to avoid to mix the trait Ext explicitly for each of these subclasses :-/ – Romain Rouvoy Feb 28 '11 at 14:33
    
I don't think the problem arises from that, just the confusion. As far as I know, there's no way of doing what you want in that way. – Submonoid Feb 28 '11 at 14:45

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